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Sports equipment

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Title: Sports equipment  
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Subject: Sport, Sports equipment, Mikasa Sports, FBT (company), Grand Sport Group
Collection: Sports Equipment
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Sports equipment

Rock-climbing equipment: Rope and climber's shoes
1990–2005 style official NFL ball
Adidas Telstar-style ball, with the familiar black and white truncated icosahedron pattern.

Sports equipment is any object used for sport or exercise. Examples of sports are listed below.

Contents

  • Balls 1
  • Exercise equipment 2
  • Flying discs 3
  • Footwear 4
  • Goals 5
  • Nets 6

Balls

Balls are used for ball games, including footballs.

Exercise equipment

Examples for exercise include swiss balls, weights, chin-up bars, equipment for the gym. Also protective equipment such as weight lifting belts and bench shirts for weight training and powerlifting.

Flying discs

Flying discs are used for various games such as freestyle, disc golf and ultimate.

Footwear

Cleats

Footwear for sports includes:

Goals

A soccer goal

In many games, goals are at each end of the playing field, there are two vertical posts (or uprights) supporting a horizontal crossbar. In some games, such as association football or hockey, the object is to pass the ball or puck between the posts below the crossbar, while in others, such as those based on Rugby, the ball must pass over the crossbar instead.

Nets

Nets are used for tennis, volleyball, football, basketball and badminton. A different type of net is used for various forms of

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