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Tachikawa Station

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Title: Tachikawa Station  
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Subject: Nambu Line, Shinjuku Station, Ōme Line, Chuo Line (Rapid), Chūō Main Line
Collection: Chūō Main Line, Nambu Line, Ōme Line, Railway Stations in Tokyo, Stations of East Japan Railway Company, Western Tokyo
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Tachikawa Station

Tachikawa Station
立川駅
Lumine Department Store above Tachikawa Station
Location
Prefecture Tokyo
(See other stations in Tokyo)
City Tachikawa
History
Opened 1889
Rail services
Operator(s) JR East
Line(s) Chūō Main Line
Nambu Line
Ōme Line
Statistics 160,411 passengers/day (FY2013)

Tachikawa Station (立川駅 Tachikawa-eki) is a railway station in the city of Tachikawa in Tokyo, Japan, operated by East Japan Railway Company (JR East). The Chūō Main Line passes through Tachikawa Station. The Ōme Line and Nambu Line terminate here. Although the Itsukaichi Line does not reach Tachikawa, a few trains on that line continue along the Ome Line tracks to serve this station.

Tachikawa-Minami Station and Tachikawa Kita Station on the Tama Toshi Monorail Line flank Tachikawa Station, and are connected to it by decks. The Lumine department store occupies the upper floors of the station building.

Contents

  • Station layout 1
  • Adjacent Stations 2
  • History 3
  • Passenger statistics 4
  • See also 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

Station layout

1・2 Ōme Line   HaijimaŌmeOkutama
Itsukaichi Line Musashi Itsukaichi
(Initial)
3 Chūō Line (Up) MitakaShinjukuTokyo  
4 Chūō Line (Up) Mitaka・Shinjuku・Tokyo
Sōbu Line TsudanumaChiba
(First Train)
(On Holidays and Saturdays Early Morning)
Ōme Line   Haijima・Ōme
Itsukaichi Line MusashiItsukaichi
(Early Morning)
5 Chūō Line (Down) HachiōjiTakaoŌtsukiKōfuMatsumoto (First Train)
(Up) Mitaka・Shinjuku・Tokyo
Sōbu Line TsudanumaChiba
(Initial)
(On Holidays and Saturdays Early Morning)
Ōme Line   Haijima・Ōme・Okutama
Itsukaichi Line MusashiItsukaichi
Hachikō Line Komagawa
(From the Chūō Line)
(Early Morning)
6 Chūō Line (Down) Hachiōji・Takao・Ōtsuki・Kōfu・Matsumoto  
Ōme Line   Haijima・Ōme・Okutama
Itsukaichi Line MusashiItsukaichi
Hachikō Line Komagawa
(From the Chūō Line)
7・8 Nambu Line   FuchūhonmachiNoboritoKawasaki  
Track layout around Tachikawa Station[1][2]
Nambu Line to Kawasaki Chūō Main Line
to Nagoya
Chūō Main Line
to Tokyo
Ōme Line to Okutama

Adjacent Stations

« Service »
Chūō Main Line
Kokubunji   Narita Express   Hachioji
Terminus Local Hino
Chūō Line (Rapid)
Shinjuku   Chūō Liner   Hachioji
Kokubunji   Commuter Special Rapid   Hachioji
Kokubunji   Chūō Special Rapid   Hino
Kokubunji   Commuter Rapid   Hino
Kunitachi   Rapid   Hino
Kunitachi   Local   Hino
Ōme Line
Shinjuku   Ōme Liner   Haijima
Kokubunji   Ōme Special Rapid   Nishi-Tachikawa
Kunitachi   Rapid   Nishi-Tachikawa
Kunitachi   Local   Nishi-Tachikawa
Nambu Line
Bubaigawara   Rapid   Terminus
Nishi-Kunitachi   Local   Terminus

History

The Kōbu Railway, which later became the Chūō Main Line, opened the station on April 11, 1889. The Ōme Railway (presently the Ōme Line) and the Nambu Railway (presently the Nambu Line) were connected to the station on November 19, 1894, and December 11, 1929, respectively.[3]

The Itsukaichi Line was also connected to the station from July 13, 1930, to October 11, 1944, via a separate track between Tachikawa and Haijima, which was closed following the integration of the operation of the Ōme and Itsukaichi lines under the Japanese Government Railways in April 1944.[4]

Passenger statistics

In fiscal 2013, the JR East station was used by an average of 160,411 passengers daily (boarding passengers only), making it the fifteenth-busiest station operated by JR East.[5]

The passenger figures for previous years are as shown below.

Fiscal year Daily average
2000 132,672[6]
2005 150,009[7]
2010 157,517[8]
2011 155,868[9]
2012 157,468[10]
2013 160,411[5]

See also

References

  1. ^ Suzuki, Fumihiko. "Tetsudō Kakusen no Jittai to Mondai o Genchi ni miru (2) - Nanbu Sen, Ōme Sen, Itsukaichi Sen (2)". The Railway Journal (in Japanese) (Tetsudō Jānaru Sha) (March 2000, No. 401): 77. 
  2. ^ Inoue, Kōji (2009). Haisenryakuzu de Hirogaru Tetsu no Sekai - Rosen o Yomitoku & Tsukuru Hon (in Japanese). Shūwa Shisutemu. p. 139.  
  3. ^ Ishino, Tetsu et al. (eds.) (1998). 停車場変遷大事典 国鉄・JR編 [Station Transition Directory - JNR/JR] (in Japanese). Tokyo: JTB Corporation. pp. 69, 178, 193, vol. II.  
  4. ^ Ishino, supra, p. 198, vol. II
  5. ^ a b 各駅の乗車人員 (2013年度) [Station passenger figures (Fiscal 2013)] (in Japanese). Japan: East Japan Railway Company. Retrieved 2 September 2014. 
  6. ^ 各駅の乗車人員 (2000年度) [Station passenger figures (Fiscal 2000)] (in Japanese). Japan: East Japan Railway Company. Retrieved 2 September 2014. 
  7. ^ 各駅の乗車人員 (2005年度) [Station passenger figures (Fiscal 2005)] (in Japanese). Japan: East Japan Railway Company. Retrieved 2 September 2014. 
  8. ^ 各駅の乗車人員 (2010年度) [Station passenger figures (Fiscal 2010)] (in Japanese). Japan: East Japan Railway Company. Retrieved 2 September 2014. 
  9. ^ 各駅の乗車人員 (2011年度) [Station passenger figures (Fiscal 2011)] (in Japanese). Japan: East Japan Railway Company. Retrieved 2 September 2014. 
  10. ^ 各駅の乗車人員 (2012年度) [Station passenger figures (Fiscal 2012)] (in Japanese). Japan: East Japan Railway Company. Retrieved 2 September 2014. 

External links

  • Station information (JR East) (Japanese)

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