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United States House of Representatives, Massachusetts District 1

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Title: United States House of Representatives, Massachusetts District 1  
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Subject: Berkshire County, Massachusetts, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, Brookfield, Massachusetts, Charlton, Massachusetts, Dudley, Massachusetts, Fisher Ames, East Brookfield, Massachusetts, Sturbridge, Massachusetts, Warren, Massachusetts, Jane Swift
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United States House of Representatives, Massachusetts District 1

Massachusetts's 1st congressional district
Current Representative Richard Neal (DSpringfield)
Area 3,101.14 mi²
Distribution 69.21% urban, 30.79% rural
Population (2000) 634,479
Median income $54,015[1]
Ethnicity 88.8% White, 1.9% Black, 1.7% Asian, 6.3% Hispanic, 0.2% Native American, 1.1% other
Occupation 23.8% blue collar, 59.7% white collar, 16.4% gray collar
Cook PVI D+14[2]

Massachusetts's 1st congressional district is in western and central Massachusetts. The largest Massachusetts district in area, it covers about one-third of the state and is more rural than the rest. It has the state's highest point, Mount Greylock. This district includes the cities of Springfield, West Springfield, Pittsfield, Holyoke, and Westfield.

The shape of the district underwent some changes effective from the elections of 2012, after Massachusetts congressional redistricting to reflect the 2010 census.[3] The entire Springfield area is included in the new 1st district, and the Worcester County areas of the old 1st district were split between the new 2nd and 3rd districts.

Richard Neal, a Democrat from Springfield, represents the district.

History

When the First District was originally created it covered part of eastern Massachusetts, generally south of Boston.

Cities and towns currently in the district

All of Berkshire County, and all of Hampden County (except for Precinct 1A in Palmer), as well the following towns and cities:

In Franklin County: Ashfield, Bernardston, Buckland, Charlemont, Colrain, Conway, Hawley, Heath, Leyden, Monroe, Rowe, and Shelburne.

In Hampshire County: Chesterfield, Cummington, Easthampton, Goshen, Granby, Huntington, Middlefield, Plainfield, South Hadley, Southampton, Westhampton, Williamsburg, and Worthington.

In Worcester County: Brookfield, Charlton, Dudley, East Brookfield, Southbridge, Sturbridge, and Warren.

Cities and towns in the district from 2003 to 2013

The district contains all of Berkshire County and Franklin County as well the following towns and cities:

In Hampden County: Blandford, Chester, Granville, Holyoke, Montgomery, Russell, Southwick, Tolland, Westfield, West Springfield.

In Hampshire County: Amherst, Belchertown, Chesterfield, Cummington, Easthampton, Goshen, Granby, Hatfield, Huntington, Middlefield, Pelham, Plainfield, Southampton, Ware, Westhampton, Williamsburg, Worthington.

In Middlesex County: Ashby, Pepperell, Townsend.

In Worcester County: Ashburnham, Athol, Barre, Fitchburg, Gardner, Hardwick, Hubbardston, Leominster, Lunenburg, New Braintree, Oakham, Petersham, Phillipston, Royalston, Sterling, Templeton, West Brookfield, Westminster, Winchendon.

List of representatives

Representative Party Years ↑ Cong. Electoral history
Fisher Ames Pro-
Administration
March 4, 1789 –
March 4, 1793
1
2
First elected as the single Representative for the seat
General ticket,
March 4, 1793 –
March 4, 1795
3 Re-elected with three others on a general ticket

Redistrcted to the 8th district
Samuel Dexter Pro-
Administration
[Data unknown/missing. You can help!]
Benjamin Goodhue Pro-
Administration
Redistricted to 10th district
Samuel Holten style="background:Template:United States political party color" |Anti-
Administration
[Data unknown/missing. You can help!]
Theodore Sedgwick Federalist March 4, 1795 –
June, 1796
4 Redistricted from 2nd district

Resigned
Vacant June 1796 –
January 27, 1797
Thomson J. Skinner Democratic-
Republican
January 27, 1797 –
March 4, 1799
4
(Continued)
[Data unknown/missing. You can help!]
5
Theodore Sedgwick Federalist March 4, 1799 –
March 4, 1801
6 [Data unknown/missing. You can help!]
John Bacon Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1801 –
March 4, 1803
7 [Data unknown/missing. You can help!]
William Eustis Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1803 –
March 4, 1805
8 Redistricted from 8th district,
Lost re-election
Josiah Quincy III Federalist March 4, 1805 –
March 4, 1813
9 [Data unknown/missing. You can help!]
10
11
12
Artemas Ward, Jr. Federalist March 4, 1813 –
March 4, 1817
13 [Data unknown/missing. You can help!]
14
Jonathan Mason Federalist March 4, 1817 –
May 15, 1820
15 Resigned to pursue law practice
16
Vacant May 15, 1820 –
November 6, 1820
Benjamin Gorham Democratic-
Republican
November 6, 1820 –
March 4, 1823
16
(Continued)
[Data unknown/missing. You can help!]
17
Daniel Webster Adams-Clay
Federalist
March 4, 1823 –
March 4, 1825
18 Resigned to become U.S. Senator
Adams March 4, 1825 –
May 30, 1827
19
20
Vacant May 30, 1827 –
July 23, 1827
Benjamin Gorham Adams July 23, 1827 –
March 4, 1829
20 [Data unknown/missing. You can help!]
Anti-
Jacksonian
March 4, 1829 –
March 3, 1831
21
Nathan Appleton Anti-
Jacksonian
March 4, 1831 –
March 4, 1833
22 Retired
Benjamin Gorham Anti-
Jacksonian
March 4, 1833 –
March 4, 1835
23 [Data unknown/missing. You can help!]
Abbott Lawrence Anti-
Jacksonian
March 4, 1835 –
March 4, 1837
24
Richard Fletcher Whig March 4, 1837 –
March 4, 1839
25 Retired
Abbott Lawrence Whig March 4, 1839 –
September 18, 1840
26 Resigned
Vacant September 18, 1840 –
November 9, 1840
Robert C. Winthrop Whig November 9, 1840 –
May 25, 1842
26
(Continued)
Resigned
27
Vacant May 25, 1842 –
June 9, 1842
Nathan Appleton Whig June 9, 1842 –
September 28, 1842
Resigned
Vacant September 28, 1842 –
November 29, 1842
Robert C. Winthrop Whig
November 29, 1842 –
July 30, 1850

27
(Continued)
Resigned to become U.S. Senator
28
29
30
31
Vacant July 30, 1850 –
August 22, 1850
31
(Continued)
Samuel A. Eliot Whig August 22, 1850 –
March 4, 1851
31
(Continued)
Retired
William Appleton Whig March 4, 1851 –
March 4, 1853
32 Redistricted to the 5th district
Zeno Scudder Whig March 4, 1853 –
March 4, 1854
33 Redistricted from the 10th district
Retired because of injury
Vacant March 4, 1854 –
April 17, 1854
Thomas D. Eliot Whig April 17, 1854 –
March 4, 1855
Retired
Robert B. Hall American
(Know Nothing)
March 4, 1855 –
March 4, 1857
34 [Data unknown/missing. You can help!]
Republican March 4, 1857 –
March 4, 1859
35
Thomas D. Eliot Republican March 4, 1859 –
March 4, 1869
36 Retired
37
38
39
40
James Buffinton Republican March 4, 1869 –
March 7, 1875
41 Died
42
43
44
Vacant March 7, 1875 –
November 2, 1875
William W. Crapo Republican November 2, 1875 –
March 4, 1883
44
(Continued)
Retired
45
46
47
Robert T. Davis Republican March 4, 1883 –
March 4, 1889
48 Retired
49
50
Charles S. Randall Republican March 4, 1889 –
March 4, 1893
51 Redistricted to the 13th district
52
Ashley B. Wright Republican March 4, 1893 –
August 14, 1897
53 Died
54
55
Vacant August 14, 1897 –
November 2, 1897
George P. Lawrence Republican November 2, 1897 –
March 4, 1913
55
(Continued)
Retired
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
Allen T. Treadway Republican March 4, 1913 –
January 3, 1945
63 Retired
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
John W. Heselton Republican January 3, 1945 –
January 3, 1959
79 Retired
80
81
82
83
84
85
Silvio O. Conte Republican January 3, 1959 –
February 8, 1991
86
87
88
89
90
91
87
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
Re-elected in 1958
Re-elected in 1960
Re-elected in 1962
Re-elected in 1964
Re-elected in 1966
Re-elected in 1968
Re-elected in 1970
Re-elected in 1972
Re-elected in 1974
Re-elected in 1976
Re-elected in 1978
Re-elected in 1980
Re-elected in 1982
Re-elected in 1984
Re-elected in 1986
Re-elected in 1988
Re-elected in 1990
Died
Vacant February 8, 1991 –
June 4, 1991
102
John Olver Democratic June 4, 1991 –
January 3, 2013
102
(Continued)
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
Elected to finish Conte's term
Re-elected in 1992
Re-elected in 1994
Re-elected in 1996
Re-elected in 1998
Re-elected in 2000
Re-elected in 2002
Re-elected in 2004
Re-elected in 2006
Re-elected in 2008
Re-elected in 2010

Retired[4]

Richard Neal Democratic January 3, 2013 – 113 Redistricted from the 2nd district,
Re-elected in 2012

Recent election results

2002 general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic John Olver 137,841 67.56
Republican Matthew Kinnaman 66,061 32.40
Write-in 117 0.06
Majority 71,780 35.18
Turnout 204,019
Democratic hold Swing
2004 general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic John Olver 229,465 99.02 + 31.46
Write-in 2,282 0.98 + 0.92
Majority 227,183 98.04 + 62.86
Turnout 231,747
Democratic hold Swing
2006 general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic John Olver 158,035 76% }
Unenrolled challenger William H. Szych 49,123 24% }
Socialist Eric Chester <253 <1%
Democratic hold Swing
2008 general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic John Olver }
Democratic Robert Feuer }
Republican Nathan Bech }

References

  • Congressional Biographical Directory of the United States 1774–present
  • Massachusetts Congressional Districts

External links

  • CNN.com 2004 election results
  • CNN.com 2006 election results
  • Map of Massachusetts's 1st Congressional District, via Massachusetts Secretary of the Commonwealth

Coordinates: 42°19′52″N 72°51′51″W / 42.33111°N 72.86417°W / 42.33111; -72.86417

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