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Cymbeline

By: Dramatis Personae

...vant to Posthumus. CORNELIUS: a physician. A Roman Captain. (Captain:) Two British Captains. A Frenchman, friend to Philario. Frenchman. Two Lords o... ...nking Cupids Of silver, each on one foot standing, nicely Depending on their brands. POSTHUMUS LEONATUS: This is her honor! Let it be granted ... ...y end Can make good use of either: she being down, I have the placing of the British crown. [Re enter CLOTEN .] How now, my son! CLOTEN: ... ...rom one side, LUCIUS, IACHIMO, and the Roman Army: from the other side, the British Army; POSTHUMUS LEONATUS following, like a poor soldier. They mar... ...unt.] SCENE III: Another part of the field. [Enter POSTHUMUS LEONATUS and a British Lord .] Lord: Camest thou from where they made the stand? POSTHU... ...re I’ll keep nor bear again, But end it by some means for Imogen. [Enter two British Captains and Soldiers .] First Captain : Great Jupiter be praise...

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The French Revolution a History Volume Three

By: Thomas Carlyle

...Jean-Jacques: not one of the least afflicting occur- rences for the actual British reader of French History;— confusing the soul with Messidors, Meado... ...r- vest. By the hundred and the thousand, men’s lives are cropt; cast like brands into the burning. Marseilles is taken, and put under martial law: lo...

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A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

By: Mark Twain

... Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court Mark Twain 35 had scared the British world almost to death; that while it lasted the whole country, fr... ... left, like their betters, to their own exertions. The most of King Arthur’s British nation were slaves, pure and simple, and bore that name, and wor... ... all rational measurement the one and only actually great man in that whole British world; and yet there and then, just as in the remote England of m... ...s Court Mark Twain 76 and I mean your best, too, society’s very choicest brands. The humblest hello girl along ten thousand miles of wire could te... ...d the founder of your great line lift him self to the sacred dignity of the British nobility?” “He built a brewery.” A Connecticut Yankee in King Art... ...d: “What was the rank and condi tion of the great grandmother who conferred British nobil ity upon your great house?” “She was a king’s leman and di...

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The Second Booke of the Faerie Queen

By: Edmund Spencer

...attring word; Soone after which, three hundred Lordes he slew Of British bloud, all sitting at his bord; Whose dolefull moniments who l... ...way her broken chaines and bands, And hauing quencht her burning fier brands, Hedlong her selfe did cast into that lake; But Impotence ...

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On Heroes, Hero-Worship, And the Heroic in History

By: Thomas Carlyle

...o longer sincere men. I do not wonder that the earnest man denounces this, brands it, prosecutes it with inextinguishable aversion. He and it, all goo... ...g men: and he was born in a poor Ayrshire hut. The largest soul of all the British lands came among us in the shape of a hard- handed Scottish Peasant... ...to every man? You would think it strange if I called Burns the most gifted British soul we had in all that century of his: and yet I believe the day i...

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The Snow Image and Other Stories by Nathaniel Hawthorne

By: Nathaniel Hawthorne

...m the insufferable glare, thrust in huge logs of oak, or stirred the immense brands with a long pole. Within the furnace were seen the curling and rio... ...row lane, through which he was passing, he beheld the broad countenance of a British hero swinging before the door of an inn, whence proceeded the voi...

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The Perfect Wagnerite : A Commentary on the Ring of the Niblungs

By: George Bernard Shaw

... must none the less fight for your life. It seems hardly possible that the British army at the battle of Waterloo did not include at least one English... ...ding it. But however offensive and inhuman may be the supersti- tion which brands such exaltations of natural passion as shameful and indecorous, ther... ...ngle orchestral rehearsal, than by ten years reading in the Library of the British Mu- seum. Wagner must have learnt between Das Rheingold and the Kai...

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The Good Soldier

By: Ford Madox Ford

... say that her ideal husband would he one who could get her received at the British Court. She had spent, it seemed, two months in Great Britain—seven ... ...d then he spent the best part of a week, in correspon- dence and up at the British consul’s, in getting the fellow’s wife to come back from London and... ...f the church. It is not the law of the land… .” “Oh yes,” Nancy said, “the Brands are Protestants.” She felt a sudden safeness descend upon her, and f... ... of her marrying me. And Leonora, I assure you, was the absolutely perfect British ma- tron. She said that she quite favoured my suit; that she could ...

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Walden, Or Life in the Woods

By: Henry David Thoreau

...ung on a thread, and when we had done, far in the night, threw the burning brands high into the air like sky rockets, which, coming down into the pon... ...n bury ing ground, a little on one side, near the unmarked graves of some British grenadiers who fell in the re treat from Concord where he is styl... ...nd mean. We think that we can change our clothes only. It is said that the British Empire is very large and respectable, and that the United States ar... ...t believe that a tide rises and falls behind every man which can float the British Empire like a chip, if he should ever harbor it in his mind. Who kn...

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Essays

By: Ralph Waldo Emerson

...ng them, they cannot die.” The poets are thus liberating gods. The ancient British bards had for the title of their order, “Those Who are free through... ...ensive of property. It vindicates no right, it aspires to no real good, it brands no crime, it proposes no generous policy; it does not build, nor wri...

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The French Revolution a History

By: Thomas Carlyle

... Lomenie’s by adoption. Not in vain has Lomenie studied the working of the British Constitution; for he professes to have some Anglo- mania, of a sort... ...itting streaks of fire? A sea cock- fight it is, and of the hottest; where British Serapis and French- American Bon Homme Richard do lash and throttle... ...f Jean-Jacques: not one of the least afflicting occurrences for the actual British reader of French History;—confusing the soul with Messidors, Meadow... ...rvest. By the hundred and the thou- sand, men’s lives are cropt; cast like brands into the burning. Marseilles is taken, and put under martial law: lo...

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What Is Man and Other Essays of Mark Twain

By: Mark Twain

..., greatly performed. Take it to pieces and examine it, if you like. Y.M. A British troop ship crowded with soldiers and their wives and children. She ... ...luable. They are like the cattle pens of a ranch—they shut in the several brands of histori cal cattle, each within its own fence, and keep them fro... ...the Government is the only cigar peddler. Italy has three or four domestic brands: the Minghetti, the T rabuco, the Virginia, and a very coarse one wh...

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The Poetical Works of Alexander Pope

By: Gilfillan

...ne of them is the grand old Greek, whose lines are all simple and plain as brands, but like brands pointed on their edges with fire. The “Essay on Man... ...ch would spoil! ‘Sir, Spain has sent a thousand jars of oil; Huge bales of British cloth blockade the door; A hundred oxen at your leveë roar.’ Poor a... ...ds your breasts with ancient ardour rise, And calls forth Roman drops from British eyes. Virtue confess’d in human shape he draws, What Plato thought,... ... Be justly warm’d with your own native rage: Such plays alone should win a British ear, As Cato’s self had not disdain’d to hear. PR PR PR PR PROL OL ... ...s hers to fight, And hers, when freedom is the theme, to write. For this a British author bids again The heroine rise, to grace the British scene: Her... ...her genuine flame, She asks, What bosom has not felt the same? Asks of the British youth—is silence there? She dares to ask it of the British fair. T ... ...se- hood, that, whenever he has a mind to calumniate his cotemporaries, he brands them with some defect which is just contrary to some good quality fo...

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