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Poets from Georgia (Country) (X)

       
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Margele Risipite

By: Florentin Smarandache

... paper, which, in fact, represent an “artificial poem”: deformed, resulted from a translation by the observant of the observed, and by translation o... ...h”, as an intellectual breathing, were superb springs. The “No” and “Anti” from my paradoxist manifestos had a creative character, not all nihilistic... ...tos had a creative character, not all nihilistic (C. M. Popa). The passage from paradoxes to paradoxism was documetarily described by Titu Popescu i... ...e, but I was Inspired from the “upside- down situation” that existed in the country. I started from politic, social, and immediately got to literatur... ...t Petrarca (14 th century) with his love antinomies, or the ancient Greek poets and playwrighters (before Jesus Christ): Pindar, Homer, Sofocles, ... ..., but I was inspired from the <upside-down situation>, that existed in the country. I started from politic, social, and immediately got to literatur... ...de frumuse ţe şi de 101 ştiinţă (în Hippias) şi iluzia de justi ţie (în Georgias). Cu Tetralogia 4, psyche, Plato dezbate antagonismul eros vers... ...Poetry Society of America; Uniunea Scriitorilor din România; International Poets Academy (India); La Société “Les Amis de la Poésie” (Fran ţa); Asso... ...ie Francophone (Fran ţa); Societatea Român ă de Haiku; Academy of American Poets; Modern Languages Association (SUA); Centre d’Études et de Recherch...

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Ultrapolemici

By: Florentin Smarandache

... paper, which, in fact, represent an “artificial poem”: deformed, resulted from a translation by the observant of the observed, and by translation o... ...h”, as an intellectual breathing, were superb springs. The “No” and “Anti” from my paradoxist manifestos had a creative character, not all nihilistic... ...tos had a creative character, not all nihilistic (C. M. Popa). The passage from paradoxes to paradoxism was documetarily described by Titu Popescu i... ...e, but I was Inspired from the “upside- down situation” that existed in the country. I started from politic, social, and immediately got to literatur... ...t Petrarca (14 th century) with his love antinomies, or the ancient Greek poets and playwrighters (before Jesus Christ): Pindar, Homer, Sofocles, ... ..., but I was inspired from the <upside-down situation>, that existed in the country. I started from politic, social, and immediately got to literatur... ...de frumuse ţe şi de 101 ştiinţă (în Hippias) şi iluzia de justi ţie (în Georgias). Cu Tetralogia 4, psyche, Plato dezbate antagonismul eros vers... ...Poetry Society of America; Uniunea Scriitorilor din România; International Poets Academy (India); La Société “Les Amis de la Poésie” (Fran ţa); Asso... ...ie Francophone (Fran ţa); Societatea Român ă de Haiku; Academy of American Poets; Modern Languages Association (SUA); Centre d’Études et de Recherch...

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When Serpents Die

By: Gerrie Ferris

...ese screen. Folding a panel, he looked out the window and let the pent-up air seep from his lungs. His was the lone car in the parking lot. Arnold... ...irmed the two signatures. Everything appeared satisfactory, and he pulled a wallet from his back pocket. “Thank you, gentlemen.” He fanned out t... ...ent to his desk, opened a drawer and brought out a slim gold case. Selecting a card from it, he jotted on the back, and handed it to the man. “Shou... ...e word haunted her. It was an alien idea she couldn’t shake. Eons ago, she’d left Georgia, and never considered returning to the insular South of h... ...e they’d founded the city of Roston, not long after Oglethorpe founded the state of Georgia. “Any clue what Bobby’s calling about?” she asked, ho... ...turtleneck. She grabbed the pea coat, too, since it was abnormally chilly for South Georgia. The evil eye. She’d experienced its terrible gaze... ...elieve he’s gone. Had a nice service though.” His voice was still Louisiana swamp country. She didn’t recall Guy at the service. The last time... ...den hair and scarf blowing together, her black coat flaring. “You’re obviously not country,” Laura Kate said. “Where are you from originally?” ... ...?” “The O’Connells are a venerable old Georgia family famous for its war heroes and poets. Statues of Black Bert O’Connell are on every town square...

...Laura Kate O'Connell left her life of excitement as an overseas news correspondent to return to her Georgia hometown to raise her two young cousins. When Royce Lee, Laura Kate's attorney, supposedly commits suicide, too many pieces of evidence tell a different story. Her instincts as an investigative reporting are tingling,...

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And Gulliver Returns Book IV : A Look at Our Human Values

By: Lemuel Gulliver XVI

............................................. 230 The Welfare State is moral from a self-centered point of view ........................................... ...elf-centered point of view .......................................... 232 From a self centered point of view it is immoral ............................. .................................................................. 233 Moral from God based assumptions ................................................... ...a limit.‖ --―Touche‘ And Con is a retired businessman. He finds your country fascinating and wants to list it on the New York Stock Exchange. L... ...e life satisfaction as earning another $50,000 a year. —―In our country people tend to work instead of vacationing so they have extra mone... ... couldn‘t have foreseen and probably would disapprove. ―One of our poets put it this way: Is there heaven or is there hell? No book nor sage... ...could strike for retirement at 35. --―In a study done in your country, at Georgia State University, found that the cost of illegitimate births and ... .... When my father visited the Soviet Union in 1962 he met a Frenchman from Georgia. The Frenchman and three friends had boarded a Russian freighter in... .... 03-1618)‖ 119. Miller v. California, 413 U.S. 15 [1973 120. Stanley v. Georgia, 394 U.S. 557[1969]) 121. Jenkins v. Georgia 418 U.S, 153 [1974])...

...city of natural resources, the excess of wastes and their proper disposal, and even some wars. In the year 2020 Commander Lemuel Gulliver XVI returns from a twenty year odyssey around the solar system, searching for sites where the world's excess people can be re-located. He found none. On his return he vows to search for solutions to the planet's most pressing problem. He...

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Heroes of Unknown Seas and Savage Lands

By: J. W. Buel

...he Wild Races of the World; FOLLOWING THE FOOTSTEPS OF ADVANCING CIVILIZATION FROM THE CAVES OF BARBARISM AND THE CRUDE CORACLE TO THE CHRISTIANIZI... ... priest -- Collection of Peter's pence in the New World -- Crusader volunteers from America -- Interruption of communication -- Disappearance of the N... ...s of a new world -- Interview with a King in America -- Description of the new country -- Intercourse between Greenland and America -- Captured and ea... ... CHAPTER IV. Early Navigators and Examples of their monster Vessel. -- A view from the plateau of the nineteenth century -- Passage of the Atlantic b... ...ore the time of Columbus -- Noah's Ark compared with modern vessels -- Egypt a country of marvels -- A great naval battle 1250 B.C. -- The monstrous s... ...ctible cloth of Salamander skin -- Story of a wonderful handkerchief -- In the country of Prester John -- Defection from Umcan -- Founding a new natio... ...t known and most poetical of all the nautical legends. Novelists have used it, poets have embellished it, dramatists have put it on the boards with al... ...eft Terra del Fuego, and continuing eastward, passed Falkland islands, isle of Georgia, and several others at which he called, so that it was not unti...

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Notes on a Journey from Cornhill to Grand Cairo

By: William Makepeace Thackeray

...ay A Penn State Electronic Classics Series Publication Notes on a Journey from Cornhill to Grand Cairo by William Makepeace Thackeray is a publica- t... ...r the file as an elec- tronic transmission, in any way. Notes on a Journey from Cornhill to Grand Cairo by William Makepeace Thackeray, the Penn- sylv... ...ersity is an equal opportunity university. 3 Thackeray Notes on a Journey from Cornhill to Grand Cairo by William Makepeace Thackeray DEDICATION TO C... ...; at seven bells, sud- denly a bell began to toll very much like that of a country church, and on going on deck we found an awning raised, a desk with... ...ed up with a wonderful clearness of air, which rarely adorns a view in our country. The sun had not yet set, but over the town and lofty rocky castle ... ...r, are you not charmed to be in this famous neighbourhood, in this land of poets and heroes, of whose history your classical edu- cation ought to have... ...to me, that I can’t at present reconcile myself to you in age. I read your poets, but it was in fear and trembling; and a cold sweat is but an ill acc... ...er four were playing with a dirty pack of cards, at a barrack that English poets have christened the “Half-way House. ”Does external nature and beauty... ...oor widow fall as dead upon him as the smiles of the brightest eyes out of Georgia. He can’t stir abroad but those abominable cannon begin roaring and...

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Democracy in America

By: Alexis de Tocqueville

... that separated the Declaration of the In- dependence of the United States from the completion of that act in the ordination of our written Constituti... ...serve should be valued by the human family. Those liberties had been wrung from reluctant monarchs in many contests, in many countries, and were group... ...eople and in vin- dication of truths that will stand for their deliverance from monarchical rule, while time shall last. A French aristocrat of the pu... ..., they thought themselves transported into those fabulous regions of which poets had sung. The sea sparkled with phosphoric light, and the extraordina... ..., they thought themselves transported into those fabulous regions of which poets had sung. The sea sparkled with phosphoric light, and the extraordina... ...i. Section 8. **See the constitutions of Illinois, Maine, Connecticut, and Georgia. 129 Tocqueville him of his power, is to commit what all the world... ...r. The question was most elaborately considered in the case of Chisholm v. Georgia, and was decided by the majority of the Supreme Court in the affirm... ...s the laws – What these causes are amongst the Anglo-Americans – Maine and Georgia, separated by a distance of a thousand miles, more naturally united... ...ss progress than in the United States; and in few have great artists, fine poets, or celebrated writers been more rare. Many Europe- ans, struck by th...

...Excerpt: In the eleven years that separated the Declaration of the Independence of the United States from the completion of that act in the ordination of our written Constitution, the great minds of America were bent upon the study of the principles of government that were essential to the preservation of the liberties which...

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Lyrical Ballads with Other Poems 1800 in Two Volumes

By: William Wordsworth

...ELL -LEAP WELL Hart-Leap Well is a small spring of water, about five miles from Richmond in Yorkshire, and near the side of the road which leads from ... ...de of the road which leads from Richmond to Askrigg. Its name is de- rived from a remarkable chase, the memory of which is preserved by the monuments ... ...s do now exist as have there described them. The Knight had ridden down from Wensley moor With the slow motion of a summer’s cloud; He turn’d a... ...erdant hills, with dwellings among trees, And Shepherds clad in the same country grey Which he himself had worn. 2 2 This description of the Cale... ...rom her birth had been An Infant of the woods. There came a Youth from Georgia’s shore, A military Casque he wore With splendid feathers drest... ...ING OF PLACES. NAMING OF PLACES. ADVERTISEMENT. By Persons resident in the country and attached to rural objects, many places will be found unnamed or... ... of those Fissures or Caverns, which in the language 71 Wordsworth of the Country are called Dungeons. The other Moun- tains either immediately surro... ... natural hearts, And with yet fonder feeling, for the sake Of youthful Poets, who among these Hills Will be my second self when I am gone. Upo...

...Excerpt: Hart-Leap Well. Hart-Leap Well is a small spring of water, about five miles from Richmond in Yorkshire, and near the side of the road which leads from Richmond to Askrigg. Its name is derived from a remarkable chase, the memory of which is preserved by the monuments spoken of in the second Part of th...

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American Notes

By: Rudyard Kipling

... Rudyard Kipling, the literary hero of the present hour, ‘the man who came from nowhere,’ as he says himself, and who a year ago was consciously nothi... ... this Mr. Kipling, then but twenty- four years old, had arrived in England from India to find that fame had preceded him. He had already gained fame i... ...ed and critical people, after reading “Departmental Ditties,” “Plain Tales from the Hills,” and various other stories and verses, had stamped him for ... ...refused admittance to all but tried friends. He made a study of the Yankee country dialect and character for “The Walking Delegate,” and while “Captai... ...in it. All the travel books will tell you about hotel arrangements in this country. They should be seen to be appreciated. Understand clearly—and this... ...oarding. Some day, perhaps, whatever sort of government may obtain in this country will make a restoration of the place and keep it clean and neat. At... ...hought beyond the enjoyment of a good time. As certain, also, of their own poets have said:— “Man is fire and woman is tow, And the devil he comes and... ...k to a white girl, the daughter of a colonel, one of the first families of Georgia’s modern chivalry, and all the weary, weary rest of it. The Souther...

...small rooms connected by a tiny hall afford sufficient space to contain Mr. Rudyard Kipling, the literary hero of the present hour, ?the man who came from nowhere,? as he says himself, and who a year ago was consciously nothing in the literary world.?...

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The Confidence- Man

By: Herman Melville

...-bag, nor parcel. No porter followed him. He was unaccompanied by friends. From the shrugged shoul- ders, titters, whispers, wonderings of the crowd, ... ...or the capture of a mysterious impostor, supposed to have recently arrived from the East; quite an original genius in his vocation, as would appear, t... ...plain, were on the capitals, or, at least, earnestly seeking sight of them from behind intervening coats; but as for their fingers, they were envelope... ...-Man the Mississippi, and the brothers Harpe, the Thugs of the Green River country, in Kentucky—creatures, with others of the sort, one and all exterm... ... a tossed look, almost linty, as if, traveling night and day from some far country beyond the prairies, he had long been without the solace of a bed. ... ...as the question of a bystander, umbrella in hand; a middle- aged person, a country merchant apparently, whose natural good-feeling had been made at le... ...k men sent out into the coun- try; sent out to natur and grass?” “Aye, and poets send out the sick spirit to green pastures, like lame horses turned o... ...hod to the turf to renew their hoofs. A sort of yarb-doctors in their way, poets have it that for sore hearts, as for sore lungs, nature is the grand ... ... or are you owned by a company?” “My master?” “Aye, for come from Maine or Georgia, you come from a slave-state, and a slave-pen, where the best breed...

...white fur one, with a long fleecy nap. He had neither trunk, valise, carpet-bag, nor parcel. No porter followed him. He was unaccompanied by friends. From the shrugged shoulders, titters, whispers, wonderings of the crowd, it was plain that he was, in the extremest sense of the word, a stranger....

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The Girl with the Golden Eyes

By: Honoré de Balzac

...hold, gaunt, yellow, tawny. Is not Paris a vast field in perpetual turmoil from a storm of interests beneath which are whirled along a crop of human b... ...a movement of disgust towards the capital, that vast workshop of delights, from 4 The Girl with the Golden Eyes which, in a short time, they cannot e... ...then lights up again, with shooting sparks, and is con- sumed. In no other country has life ever been more ardent or acute. The social nature, even in... ...owers of a day—ephemeral trifles; and so, too, it throws up fire and flame from its eternal crater. Per- haps, before analyzing the causes which lend ... ... will never be missed by it. What, then, is the dominating impulse in this country without morals, without faith, without any sentiment, wherein, how-... ...Paquita, tranquilly. “My dear Adolphe, she is my mother, a slave bought in Georgia for her rare beauty, little enough of which remains to-day. She onl... ...ing, cadaverous, mon- strous, savagely ferocious, which the imagination of poets and painters had not yet conceived. In effect, no rendezvous had ever... ...n’s feet. The chink of the gold was potent enough to excite a smile on the Georgian’s impassive face. “I come at the right moment for you, my sister,”... ... not overlook?” “I have her mother,” replied the Marquise, designating the Georgian, to whom she made a sign to remain. “We shall meet again,” said He...

...urely, the general aspect of the Parisian populace-- a people fearful to behold, gaunt, yellow, tawny. Is not Paris a vast field in perpetual turmoil from a storm of interests beneath which are whirled along a crop of human beings, who are, more often than not, reaped by death, only to be born again as pinched as ever, men whose twisted and contorted faces give out at ever...

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What Is Man and Other Essays of Mark Twain

By: Mark Twain

... 6 sulphur and stone and other obstructing inborn heredities, brought down from the old geologic ages—prejudices, let us call them. Prejudices which n... ...trong ones. In each case, to get the best results, you must free the metal from its obstructing prejudicial ones by education— smelting, refining, and... ...e odds and ends of thoughts, impressions, feelings, gathered unconsciously from a thou sand books, a thousand conversations, and from streams of thou... ...at proposi tion. O.M. For instance? Y.M. Take that noble passion, love of country, patrio tism. A man who loves peace and dreads pain, leaves his pl... ...lf to saving imperiled souls. He became a missionary. He landed in a pagan country ill and helpless. A native widow took him into her humble home and ... ...uestion without any hesitancy. “General, who planned the the march through Georgia?” “The enemy!” He added that the enemy usu ally makes your plans... ...history as well as English, and that answered very well. English and alien poets, statesmen, artists, heroes, battles, plagues, cataclysms, revolution... ...es, slaughter one another’s subjects; it has raised up prize fighters, and poets, and villages mayors, and little and big politicians, and big and lit... ...nfin ished literary work, not a scrap of manuscript of any kind . Many poets have died poor, but this is the only one in history that has died th...

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The Writings of Abraham Lincoln in Seven Volumes Volume 7 of 7

By: Abraham Lincoln

... have recently reached the War Department, and thence been laid before me, from Missouri, three communications, all similar in import and identical in... ... attention to this region, particularly on election day. Prevent violence from whatever quarter, and see that the soldiers themselves do no wrong. Y ... ...field. My wish, then, is compounded of what I believe will be best for the country; and it is that he will come here, put his military commission in m... ... him retake his commis- sion and return to the army for the benefit of the country. This will heal a dangerous schism for him. It will relieve him fr... ...e country. This will heal a dangerous schism for him. It will relieve him from a dangerous position or a misunderstanding, as I think he is in danger... ...the States of Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, South Carolina, and North Carolina, a number of persons, ... ...he House of Representatives, and especially on re- cent military events in Georgia and Tennessee. Y ours very truly, A. LINCOLN. 46 The Writings of A... ...nd eight hundred and sixty-one, the ports of the States of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas were, for reas... ...incoln: V ol Seven must say, that if all that has been said by orators and poets since the creation of the world in praise of women were ap- plied to ...

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North America Volume Two

By: Anthony Trollope

...f water-carriage and a sea-port; secondly, that it might be so far removed from the sea-board as to be safe from invasion; and, thirdly, that it might... ... into our hands, and we burned it. As regards the third point, Washington, from the lie of the land, can hardly have been said to be centrical at any ... ...ng to the irregularities of the coast it is not easy of access by railways from different sides. Baltimore would have been far better. But as far as w... .... I fear, therefore, that we must acknowledge that the site chosen for his country’s capital by George Wash- 5 Trollope ington has not been fortunate... ...- cient to bind his successors to his wishes. The political leaders of the country have done what they could for Washington. The pride of the nation h... ...o man had yet heard. Of the slave States, Virginia, the two Carolinas, and Georgia were alone wedded to slavery. Then the matter might have been man- ... ...cratic in its nature—aristocratic and patriarchal. A large slaveowner from Georgia may call himself a democrat, may think that he reveres republican i... ...ed all that was demanded. Had secession been granted to South Carolina and Georgia, Virginia would have been coerced to join those States by the natur... ...n historians are acknowledged as great au- thors, and as regards their own poets, will sometimes de- mand your admiration for strains with which you h...

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My Bondage and My Freedom by Frederick Douglass. With an Introduction. By James M'Cune Smith

By: Frederick Douglas

...y a principle essential to Christianity, a PERSON is eternally differenced from a THING; so that the idea of a HUMAN BEING, necessarily excludes the i... ...al plea—”not guilty;” the case must, therefore, proceed. Any facts, either from slaves, slaveholders, or by-standers, calculated to enlighten the publ... ...wrongs, and do not apprehend their rights. Looking, then, at your request, from this stand-point, and wishing every- thing of which you think me capab... ...though scarcely a month passed without the sale of one or more lots to the Georgia traders, there was no apparent diminution in the number of his hu- ... ..., that, for having found fault with his master, he was now to be sold to a Georgia trader. He was immediately chained and handcuffed; and thus, withou... .... Hamilton and Freeland came up to Easton; not to make a bargain with the “Georgia traders,” nor to send us up to Austin Woldfolk, as is usual in the ... ..., merchants, and secretaries, having among us lawyers, doctors, ministers, poets, authors, editors, orators, and teach- ers; that, while we are engage... ... inward decay. Its auxiliaries are everywhere. Scholars, authors, orators, poets, and statesmen give it their aid. The most brilliant of American poet... ...nt for letting drop a smiling verse of sympathy for the man in chains. The poets are with us. It would seem almost absurd to say it, considering the u...

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In the Fourth Year Anticipations of a World Peace

By: H. G. Wells

...ve no possible interest; they will have come at these questions themselves from different angles and they will have long since got to their own conclu... ... of Mr. Fayle’s “Great Settle- ment” (1915), a frankly sceptical treatment from the British Imperialist point of view, on the other. An illuminating d... ...r Walter Phillimore’s “Three Centuries of Treaties.” Two ex- cellent books from America, that chance to be on my table, are Mr. Goldsmith’s “League to... ...rite some language or other; Bogota with a population of a million, mostly poets; Hayti with a population of a mil- lion and a third, almost entirely ... ...e- thing more effective, Italy, France, the United States, Japan, and this country will send separate groups of representatives, with separate instruc... ...of the time is the evident desire of the Labour movement in every European country to take part in a collateral conference of Labour that shall meet w... ...n eventualities with- out a loss of your sovereign freedom. People in this country and in France do not seem to be sitting up manfully to these necess... ..., or the Jews in Roumania, or the Poles in West Prussia, or the negroes in Georgia, or the Indi- ans in the T ransvaal make such an appeal? Could any ...

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20, 000 Leagues under the Sea

By: Jules Verne

...re nor less than with an aquatic mammal, unknown till then, which threw up from its blow-holes columns of water mixed with air and vapour. Similar fac... ...Navigation Company. But this extraordinary creature could transport itself from one place to another with surprising velocity; as, in an inter- val of... ...ed in the pa- pers caricatures of every gigantic and imaginary crea- ture, from the white whale, the terrible “Moby Dick” of sub-arctic regions, to th... ...ary and longing for repose. I aspired to nothing more than again seeing my country, my friends, my little lodging by the Jardin des Plantes, my dear a... ...of a journey, never make an objection to pack his portmanteau for whatever country it might be, or how- ever far away, whether China or Congo. Besides... ...rmed,” replied Ned Land, sharply. “They are rascals.” “Good! and from what country?” “From the land of rogues!” “My brave Ned, that country is not cle... ... nothing but love and emotion; it is the `Living Infinite,’ as one of your poets has said. In fact, Professor, Nature manifests herself in it by her t... ... that the debris of shipwrecked vessels had been seen on the coasts of New Georgia. But D’Entrecasteaux, ignoring this communication—rather uncertain,... ...aint such pictures, one must have the pen of the most illustri- ous of our poets, the author of The Toilers of the Deep. I have said that Captain Nemo...

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Main Street

By: Sinclair Lewis

...aching comedy of expectant youth. It is Carol Milford, fleeing for an hour from Blodgett College. The days of pioneering, of lassies in sunbonnets, an... ...onsin, the Dakotas send their children thither, and Blodgett protects them from the wickedness of the universities. But it secretes friendly girls, yo... ...- ness of her body when they saw her in sheer negligee, or darting out wet from a shower-bath. She seemed then but half as large as they had supposed;... ...air Lewis therefore taboo, but he had come from Boston, he had lived among poets and socialists and Jews and million- aire uplifters at the University... ...s—the light of the library, an authority on books, invited to dinners with poets and explorers, read- ing a paper to an association of distinguished s... ...hose nature was not very clearly revealed to her, turn a prairie town into Georgian houses and Japanese bungalows. The next day in library class she h... ...his coat pocket, wipes the tobacco crumbs off, and plays “Marching through Georgia” till every head in the car begins to ache. The news-butcher comes ... ...umber of very interesting papers, this is such an interesting subject, the poets, they have been an inspiration for higher thought, in fact wasn’t it ... ...r thin fingers playing a tattoo on her cheeks. She saw in Gopher Prairie a Georgian city hall: warm brick walls with white shutters, a fanlight, a wid...

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Babbitt

By: Sinclair Lewis

...y was full of such grotesqueries, but the clean towers were thrusting them from the business center, and on the farther hills were shining new houses,... ... hood and noiseless engine. These people in evening clothes were returning from an all-night rehearsal of a Little Theater play, an artistic adventure... ... in the darkness beyond mysterious groves. When at last he could slip away from the crowded house he darted to her. His wife, his clamoring friends, s... ...e sooner he’ll get on the job and produce—produce—produce! That’s what the country needs, and not all this fancy stuff that just enfeebles the will-po... ...nd hand-shaking house- organs, as richly poured forth by the new school of Poets of Business. He had painfully written out a first draft, and he inton... ...air Lewis Zenith could not have told whether he was in a city of Oregon or Georgia, Ohio or Maine, Oklahoma or Manitoba. But to Babbitt every inch was... ...ay Evening Post—an elm-lined snowy street of these new 90 Babbitt houses, Georgian some of ‘em, or with low raking roofs and—The kind of street you’d... ... The only thing is: I wonder if it sells the goods? Course, like all these poets, this Prince Albert fellow lets his idea run away with him. It makes ... ...ie Swanson. “You ought to get him easy, Mr. Frink, you and he being fellow-poets,” said Louetta Swanson. “Fellow-poets, rats! Where d’ you get that st...

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Barchester Towers

By: Anthony Trollope

..., peaceably, slowly, without pain and without excitement. The breath ebbed from him almost imperceptibly, and for a month before his death, it was a q... ...on his last legs; but the ministry was also tottering. Dr Grantly returned from Oxford happy and elated, to resume his place in the pal- ace, and to c... ...ve him his due, he performed with more tender care than was to be expected from his usual somewhat worldly manners. A month since the physicians had n... ...ds should be alienated for the education of the agri- cultural poor of the country, and he amused the House by some anecdotes touching the superstitio... ...Anthony Trollope trust by their brethren. No man was so surely a tory as a country rector—nowhere were the powers that be so cher- ished as at Oxford.... ...e city. Where- upon the lady hoped that the distance was not too great for country visiting, as she would be so glad to make the acquaintance of Mrs G... ...at he was destined to add another name to the imperishable list of English poets. From Winchester he went to Oxford, and was entered as a commoner at ... ...ican president. No won- derful tragedies had occurred on railway trains in Georgia, or elsewhere. There was a dearth of broken banks, and a dead dean ...

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A Treatise on Government Translated from the Greek of Aristotle

By: William Ellis A. M.

...A TREATISE ON GOVERNMENT TRANSLATED FROM THE GREEK OF ARISTOTLE BY WILLIAM ELLIS, A.M. A PENN STATE ELECTRONIC ... ...l opportunity university. 3 Aristotle A TREATISE ON GOVERNMENT TRANSLATED FROM THE GREEK OF ARISTOTLE BY WILLIAM ELLIS, A.M. LONDON &.TORONTO PUBLISH... ...litics mainly a description of a Utopia or ideal state which might inspire poets or philosophers but have little direct effect upon political institut... ...blic is obviously impracticable, for its author had turned away in despair from existing politics. He has no proposals, in that dialogue at least, for... ...can be nothing but between slaves of different sexes. For which reason the poets say, it is proper for the Greeks to govern the barbarians, as if a ba... ...; thus also it is with those of noble descent: it is not only in their own country that they are Esteemed as such, but everywhere, but the barbarians ... ...of this sort. They do much better who enumerate the different vir- tues as Georgias did, than those who thus define them; and as Sophocles speaks of a... ...ant there thirty years, Periander forty-four, and Psammetichus, the son of Georgias, three years; the reason for which was, that Cypselus was a popula... ...asion for the virtues of temperance and justice. Thus if there are, as the poets tell us, any inhabitants in the happy isles, to these a higher degree...

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Leaves of Grass

By: Walt Whitman

...ne I Sing................22 Shut Not Your Doors...........................22 Poets to Come.....................................22 To You................. ..............23 BOOK II............................................24 Starting from Paumanok.....................24 BOOK III............................... ...OK IV. CHILDREN OF ADAM ...103 To the Garden the World...................103 From Pent Up Aching Rivers............103 I Sing the Body Electric.......... ...t Pipes of the Organ.........................................121 Facing West from California’s Shores ................................................... ...e with distrustful aspect, Terrible in beauty, age, and power, The genius of poets of old lands, As to me directing like flame its eyes, With finger p... ...elt by the intellect, But you ye untold latencies will thrill to every page. POETS TO C OME Poets to come! orators, singers, musicians to come! Not t... ... States as during life, each man and woman my neighbor, The Louisianian, the Georgian, as near to me, and I as near to him and her, The Mississippian ... ...n walking the vale of the Elkhorn in my deer skin leggings, a Louisianian or Georgian, A boatman over lakes or bays or along coasts, a Hoosier, Badger... ...e live oak trailing long and low, noiselessly waved by the wind, The camp of Georgia wagoners just after dark, the supper fires and the cooking and ea...

...Excerpt: BOOK I. INSCRIPTIONS. One?s-self I sing, a simple separate person, Yet utter the word Democratic, the word En-Masse. Of physiology from top to toe I sing, Not physiognomy alone nor brain alone is worthy for the Muse, I say the Form complete is worthier far, The Female equally with the Male I sing. Of Life immense in passion, pulse, and power, Cheerful, f...

.......21 What Place Is Besieged?......................22 Still Though the One I Sing................22 Shut Not Your Doors...........................22 Poets to Come.....................................22 To You................................................23 Thou Reader........................................23 BOOK II............................................24 Startin...

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Walden Or, Life in the Woods

By: Henry David Thoreau

...owing pages, or rather the bulk of them, I lived alone, in the woods, a mile from any neighbor, in a house which I had built myself, on the shore of W... ...eard of other men’s lives; some such account as he would send to his kindred from a distant land; for if he has lived sincerely, it must have been in ... ...ecomes impossible for them to resume 2 Walden their natural position, while from the twist of the neck nothing but liquids can pass into the stomach;... ...m, and not seeing where they fell. Most men, even in this comparatively free country, through mere ignorance and mistake, are so occupied with the fac... ...n is confirmed desperation. From the desperate city you go into the desperate country, and have to console yourself with the bravery of minks and muskr... ...airest and most memorable of the actions of men, date from such an hour. All poets and heroes, like Memnon, are the children of Aurora, and emit their... .... By such a pile we may hope to scale heaven at last. The works of the great poets have never yet been read by mankind, for only great poets can read ... ...nsonian. Wise midnight hags! It is no honest and blunt tu whit tu who of the poets, but, without jesting, a most solemn graveyard ditty, the mutual co... ... and Texas, of England and the Indies, of the Hon. Conclusion 205 Mr. —— of Georgia or of Massachusetts, all transient and fleeting phenomena, till I ...

...Excerpt: WHEN I wrote the following pages, or rather the bulk of them, I lived alone, in the woods, a mile from any neighbor, in a house which I had built myself, on the shore of Walden Pond, in Concord, Massachusetts, and earned my living by the labor of my hands only. I lived there two years and two months. At present I am a soj...

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An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations

By: Adam Smith

...APTER IV HOW THE COMMERCE OF TOWNS CONTRIBUTED TO THE IM- PROVEMENT OF THE COUNTRY ...................................................................... ...ERCIAL OR MERCANTILE SYSTEM 342 CHAPTER II OF RESTRAINTS UPON IMPORTATION FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES OF SUCH GOODS AS CAN BE PRODUCED AT HOME .............. ...XTRAORDINARY RESTRAINTS UPON THE IMPORTATION OF GOODS OF ALMOST ALL KINDS, FROM THOSE COUNTRIES WITH WHICH THE BALANCE IS SUPPOSED TO BE DISADVANTAGEO... ...EITHER THE SOLE OR THE PRINCIPAL SOURCE OF THE REVENUE AND WEALTH OF EVERY COUNTRY ...................................................................... ...mmediate produce of that labour, or in what is purchased with that produce from other nations. According, therefore, as this produce, or what is purch... ...er eminent teachers in those times appear to have acquired great fortunes. Georgias made a present to the temple of Delphi of his own statue in solid ... ...nd South Carolina, £8000 each. The civil establishments of Nova Scotia and Georgia are partly sup- ported by an annual grant of parliament; but Nova S... ...besides, about £7000 a-year towards the public expenses of the colony, and Georgia about £2500 a-year. All the different civil establishments in North... ...letters. It may, perhaps, be worth while to remark, that, if we except the poets, a few orators, and a few historians, the far greater part of the oth...

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The Voyage of the Beagle

By: Charles Darwin

... Roy, of having some scien- tific person on board, accompanied by an offer from him of giving up part of his own accommodations, that I volunteered my... ...o him; and to add that, during the five years we were together, I received from him the most cordial friendship and steady as- sistance. Both to Capta... ...ollected, and I trust that many others will here- after follow. The plants from the southern parts of America will be given by Dr. J. Hooker, in his g... ...pical sun, have in most places rendered the soil unfit for vegetation. The country rises in successive steps of table-land, interspersed with some tru... ... eastward of Porto Praya. Until we reached the valley of St. Mar- tin, the country presented its usual dull brown ap- pearance; but here, a very small... ...In a MS. in the British Museum by Mr. Abbott, who made his observations in Georgia; see Mr. A. White’s paper in the “Annals of Nat. Hist.,” vol. vii. ... ...ick with everlasting snow;” and there seems to be scarcely any vegetation. Georgia, an island 96 miles long and 10 broad, in the latitude of Yorkshire... ...the valley of Quillota. The country was exceedingly pleasant; just such as poets would call pastoral: green open lawns, sepa- rated by small valleys w... ...austless delight of anticipating the long wished-for day of return. If, as poets say, life is a dream, I am sure in a voyage these are the visions whi...

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Walden, Or Life in the Woods

By: Henry David Thoreau

...ing pages, or rather the bulk of them, I lived alone, in the woods, a mile from any neigh bor, in a house which I had built myself, on the shore of W... ...rd of other men’s lives; some such account as he would send to his kindred from a distant land; for if he has lived sin cerely, it must have been in ... ...l it becomes impossible for them to re sume their natural position, while from the twist of the neck nothing but liquids can pass into the stom ach”... ...nd not seeing where they fell. Most men, even in this comparatively free country, through mere ignorance and mistake, are so occupied with the facti... ...s confirmed desperation. From the desperate city you go into the desperate country, and have to console yourself with the bravery of minks and muskrat... ...rest and most memorable of the actions of men, date from such an hour. All poets and heroes, like Memnon, are the chil dren of Aurora, and emit their... ... such a pile we may hope to scale heaven at last. The works of the great poets have never yet been read by mankind, for only great poets can read th... ...nian. Wise midnight bags! It is no honest and blunt tu whit tu who of the poets, but, without jesting, a most solemn graveyard ditty, the mutual cons... ... of Califor nia and Texas, of England and the Indies, of the Hon. Mr.— of Georgia or of Massachusetts, all transient and fleeting phenomena, till I a...

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The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin with Introduction and Notes Edited

By: Charles W. Eliot

...turned to his former trade, and shortly set up a print ing house of his own from which he published “The Pennsyl vania Gazette,” to which he contrib... ...gent for the colony, this time to petition the King to resume the government from the hands of the proprietors. In London he actively opposed the pro ... ...e of French society; and with such success did he conduct the affairs of his country that when he finally returned he received a place only second to ... ... AUTOBIOGRAPHY 1706 1757 TWYFORD, at the Bishop of St. Asaph’s, 1771. The country seat of Bishop Shipley, the good bishop, as Dr. Franklin used to ... ...them for you. To which I have besides some other inducements. Having emerged from the poverty and obscurity in which I was born and bred, to a state o... ...t become eminent in it, and make his for tune by it, alleging that the best poets must, when they first began to write, make as many faults as he did... ... Whitefield, in leaving us, went preaching all the way thro’ the colonies to Georgia. The settlement of that prov ince had lately been begun, but, in... ... which I myself was an instance. I did not disapprove of the design, but, as Georgia was then destitute of materials and workmen, and it was pro pose... ...also one of our club, who, being of my sentiments respecting the building in Georgia, and suspecting a collec tion might be intended, had, by precaut...

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The Letters of Robert Louis Stevenson to His Family and Friends ; Selected and Edited with Notes and Introd. By Sidney Colvin : Volume 1

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

...hope you will find your house at Mentone nice. I have been obliged to stop from writing by the want of a pen, but now I have one, so I will con- tinue... ...se of justice forbids the receipt of less – than half-a- crown. – Greeting from, Sir, your most affectionate and needy son, R. STEVENSON. Letter: TO M... ... tribe of gipsies. The men are always drunk, simply and truthfully always. From morning to evening the great villainous-looking fellows are either sle... ...ugh vitality in them to keep their monstrous bodies fresh withal. A shrewd country attorney, in a turned white neckcloth and rusty blacks, would just ... ...absence the rest were pouring into my ears the fame and acquirements of my countryman. He was, in some undecipherable manner, connected with the Queen... ...ut not to give you news. There is a great stir of life, in a quiet, almost country fashion, all about us here. Some one is hammering a beef-steak in t... ...hey talked very nicely, and are bright, likable women both. They come from Georgia. WEDNESDAY , 10.30. – We have all been to tea to-night at the Russi... ... good and bright piece of work, and recognised a link of sympathy with the poets who ‘play in hostelries at euchre.’ – Believe me, dear sir, yours tru...

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