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Poets from Georgia (Country) (X)

       
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A Treatise on Government Translated from the Greek of Aristotle

By: William Ellis A. M.

...A TREATISE ON GOVERNMENT TRANSLATED FROM THE GREEK OF ARISTOTLE BY WILLIAM ELLIS, A.M. A PENN STATE ELECTRONIC ... ...l opportunity university. 3 Aristotle A TREATISE ON GOVERNMENT TRANSLATED FROM THE GREEK OF ARISTOTLE BY WILLIAM ELLIS, A.M. LONDON &.TORONTO PUBLISH... ...litics mainly a description of a Utopia or ideal state which might inspire poets or philosophers but have little direct effect upon political institut... ...blic is obviously impracticable, for its author had turned away in despair from existing politics. He has no proposals, in that dialogue at least, for... ...can be nothing but between slaves of different sexes. For which reason the poets say, it is proper for the Greeks to govern the barbarians, as if a ba... ...; thus also it is with those of noble descent: it is not only in their own country that they are Esteemed as such, but everywhere, but the barbarians ... ...of this sort. They do much better who enumerate the different vir- tues as Georgias did, than those who thus define them; and as Sophocles speaks of a... ...ant there thirty years, Periander forty-four, and Psammetichus, the son of Georgias, three years; the reason for which was, that Cypselus was a popula... ...asion for the virtues of temperance and justice. Thus if there are, as the poets tell us, any inhabitants in the happy isles, to these a higher degree...

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Leaves of Grass

By: Walt Whitman

...ne I Sing................22 Shut Not Your Doors...........................22 Poets to Come.....................................22 To You................. ..............23 BOOK II............................................24 Starting from Paumanok.....................24 BOOK III............................... ...OK IV. CHILDREN OF ADAM ...103 To the Garden the World...................103 From Pent Up Aching Rivers............103 I Sing the Body Electric.......... ...t Pipes of the Organ.........................................121 Facing West from California’s Shores ................................................... ...e with distrustful aspect, Terrible in beauty, age, and power, The genius of poets of old lands, As to me directing like flame its eyes, With finger p... ...elt by the intellect, But you ye untold latencies will thrill to every page. POETS TO C OME Poets to come! orators, singers, musicians to come! Not t... ... States as during life, each man and woman my neighbor, The Louisianian, the Georgian, as near to me, and I as near to him and her, The Mississippian ... ...n walking the vale of the Elkhorn in my deer skin leggings, a Louisianian or Georgian, A boatman over lakes or bays or along coasts, a Hoosier, Badger... ...e live oak trailing long and low, noiselessly waved by the wind, The camp of Georgia wagoners just after dark, the supper fires and the cooking and ea...

...Excerpt: BOOK I. INSCRIPTIONS. One?s-self I sing, a simple separate person, Yet utter the word Democratic, the word En-Masse. Of physiology from top to toe I sing, Not physiognomy alone nor brain alone is worthy for the Muse, I say the Form complete is worthier far, The Female equally with the Male I sing. Of Life immense in passion, pulse, and power, Cheerful, f...

.......21 What Place Is Besieged?......................22 Still Though the One I Sing................22 Shut Not Your Doors...........................22 Poets to Come.....................................22 To You................................................23 Thou Reader........................................23 BOOK II............................................24 Startin...

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Walden Or, Life in the Woods

By: Henry David Thoreau

...owing pages, or rather the bulk of them, I lived alone, in the woods, a mile from any neighbor, in a house which I had built myself, on the shore of W... ...eard of other men’s lives; some such account as he would send to his kindred from a distant land; for if he has lived sincerely, it must have been in ... ...ecomes impossible for them to resume 2 Walden their natural position, while from the twist of the neck nothing but liquids can pass into the stomach;... ...m, and not seeing where they fell. Most men, even in this comparatively free country, through mere ignorance and mistake, are so occupied with the fac... ...n is confirmed desperation. From the desperate city you go into the desperate country, and have to console yourself with the bravery of minks and muskr... ...airest and most memorable of the actions of men, date from such an hour. All poets and heroes, like Memnon, are the children of Aurora, and emit their... .... By such a pile we may hope to scale heaven at last. The works of the great poets have never yet been read by mankind, for only great poets can read ... ...nsonian. Wise midnight hags! It is no honest and blunt tu whit tu who of the poets, but, without jesting, a most solemn graveyard ditty, the mutual co... ... and Texas, of England and the Indies, of the Hon. Conclusion 205 Mr. —— of Georgia or of Massachusetts, all transient and fleeting phenomena, till I ...

...Excerpt: WHEN I wrote the following pages, or rather the bulk of them, I lived alone, in the woods, a mile from any neighbor, in a house which I had built myself, on the shore of Walden Pond, in Concord, Massachusetts, and earned my living by the labor of my hands only. I lived there two years and two months. At present I am a soj...

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An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations

By: Adam Smith

...APTER IV HOW THE COMMERCE OF TOWNS CONTRIBUTED TO THE IM- PROVEMENT OF THE COUNTRY ...................................................................... ...ERCIAL OR MERCANTILE SYSTEM 342 CHAPTER II OF RESTRAINTS UPON IMPORTATION FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES OF SUCH GOODS AS CAN BE PRODUCED AT HOME .............. ...XTRAORDINARY RESTRAINTS UPON THE IMPORTATION OF GOODS OF ALMOST ALL KINDS, FROM THOSE COUNTRIES WITH WHICH THE BALANCE IS SUPPOSED TO BE DISADVANTAGEO... ...EITHER THE SOLE OR THE PRINCIPAL SOURCE OF THE REVENUE AND WEALTH OF EVERY COUNTRY ...................................................................... ...mmediate produce of that labour, or in what is purchased with that produce from other nations. According, therefore, as this produce, or what is purch... ...er eminent teachers in those times appear to have acquired great fortunes. Georgias made a present to the temple of Delphi of his own statue in solid ... ...nd South Carolina, £8000 each. The civil establishments of Nova Scotia and Georgia are partly sup- ported by an annual grant of parliament; but Nova S... ...besides, about £7000 a-year towards the public expenses of the colony, and Georgia about £2500 a-year. All the different civil establishments in North... ...letters. It may, perhaps, be worth while to remark, that, if we except the poets, a few orators, and a few historians, the far greater part of the oth...

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The Voyage of the Beagle

By: Charles Darwin

... Roy, of having some scien- tific person on board, accompanied by an offer from him of giving up part of his own accommodations, that I volunteered my... ...o him; and to add that, during the five years we were together, I received from him the most cordial friendship and steady as- sistance. Both to Capta... ...ollected, and I trust that many others will here- after follow. The plants from the southern parts of America will be given by Dr. J. Hooker, in his g... ...pical sun, have in most places rendered the soil unfit for vegetation. The country rises in successive steps of table-land, interspersed with some tru... ... eastward of Porto Praya. Until we reached the valley of St. Mar- tin, the country presented its usual dull brown ap- pearance; but here, a very small... ...In a MS. in the British Museum by Mr. Abbott, who made his observations in Georgia; see Mr. A. White’s paper in the “Annals of Nat. Hist.,” vol. vii. ... ...ick with everlasting snow;” and there seems to be scarcely any vegetation. Georgia, an island 96 miles long and 10 broad, in the latitude of Yorkshire... ...the valley of Quillota. The country was exceedingly pleasant; just such as poets would call pastoral: green open lawns, sepa- rated by small valleys w... ...austless delight of anticipating the long wished-for day of return. If, as poets say, life is a dream, I am sure in a voyage these are the visions whi...

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Walden, Or Life in the Woods

By: Henry David Thoreau

...ing pages, or rather the bulk of them, I lived alone, in the woods, a mile from any neigh bor, in a house which I had built myself, on the shore of W... ...rd of other men’s lives; some such account as he would send to his kindred from a distant land; for if he has lived sin cerely, it must have been in ... ...l it becomes impossible for them to re sume their natural position, while from the twist of the neck nothing but liquids can pass into the stom ach”... ...nd not seeing where they fell. Most men, even in this comparatively free country, through mere ignorance and mistake, are so occupied with the facti... ...s confirmed desperation. From the desperate city you go into the desperate country, and have to console yourself with the bravery of minks and muskrat... ...rest and most memorable of the actions of men, date from such an hour. All poets and heroes, like Memnon, are the chil dren of Aurora, and emit their... ... such a pile we may hope to scale heaven at last. The works of the great poets have never yet been read by mankind, for only great poets can read th... ...nian. Wise midnight bags! It is no honest and blunt tu whit tu who of the poets, but, without jesting, a most solemn graveyard ditty, the mutual cons... ... of Califor nia and Texas, of England and the Indies, of the Hon. Mr.— of Georgia or of Massachusetts, all transient and fleeting phenomena, till I a...

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The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin with Introduction and Notes Edited

By: Charles W. Eliot

...turned to his former trade, and shortly set up a print ing house of his own from which he published “The Pennsyl vania Gazette,” to which he contrib... ...gent for the colony, this time to petition the King to resume the government from the hands of the proprietors. In London he actively opposed the pro ... ...e of French society; and with such success did he conduct the affairs of his country that when he finally returned he received a place only second to ... ... AUTOBIOGRAPHY 1706 1757 TWYFORD, at the Bishop of St. Asaph’s, 1771. The country seat of Bishop Shipley, the good bishop, as Dr. Franklin used to ... ...them for you. To which I have besides some other inducements. Having emerged from the poverty and obscurity in which I was born and bred, to a state o... ...t become eminent in it, and make his for tune by it, alleging that the best poets must, when they first began to write, make as many faults as he did... ... Whitefield, in leaving us, went preaching all the way thro’ the colonies to Georgia. The settlement of that prov ince had lately been begun, but, in... ... which I myself was an instance. I did not disapprove of the design, but, as Georgia was then destitute of materials and workmen, and it was pro pose... ...also one of our club, who, being of my sentiments respecting the building in Georgia, and suspecting a collec tion might be intended, had, by precaut...

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The Letters of Robert Louis Stevenson to His Family and Friends ; Selected and Edited with Notes and Introd. By Sidney Colvin : Volume 1

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

...hope you will find your house at Mentone nice. I have been obliged to stop from writing by the want of a pen, but now I have one, so I will con- tinue... ...se of justice forbids the receipt of less – than half-a- crown. – Greeting from, Sir, your most affectionate and needy son, R. STEVENSON. Letter: TO M... ... tribe of gipsies. The men are always drunk, simply and truthfully always. From morning to evening the great villainous-looking fellows are either sle... ...ugh vitality in them to keep their monstrous bodies fresh withal. A shrewd country attorney, in a turned white neckcloth and rusty blacks, would just ... ...absence the rest were pouring into my ears the fame and acquirements of my countryman. He was, in some undecipherable manner, connected with the Queen... ...ut not to give you news. There is a great stir of life, in a quiet, almost country fashion, all about us here. Some one is hammering a beef-steak in t... ...hey talked very nicely, and are bright, likable women both. They come from Georgia. WEDNESDAY , 10.30. – We have all been to tea to-night at the Russi... ... good and bright piece of work, and recognised a link of sympathy with the poets who ‘play in hostelries at euchre.’ – Believe me, dear sir, yours tru...

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