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Social Democratic Parties (X)

       
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North America Volume Two

By: Anthony Trollope

...ood sense to be guided in civil matters by men who had studied the laws of social life and the theories of free government. He was justus et tenax pro... ...eir Northern brethren. They and their fami- lies had been more addicted to social pleasures. They are the descendants of the old English Cavaliers, wh... ... indeed there was such a shout of triumph that no ministry in a country so democratic could have ventured to go at once against it, and to do so witho... ... to their work with the exercise of all their energies. They organized the Democratic party so 58 North America V ol. 2 as to include the leaders amo... ...obably be given mainly to Madison and Hamilton, Madison finding the French democratic element, and Hamilton the English conserva- tive element—this qu... ...glish money. Russia and England are not more unlike in their political and social feelings than are the real slave States and the real free-soil State... ...reed, no such radical difference as to the essential rules of life between parties in our country. We have no such cause for personal rancor in our Pa... ... existed for some years past in both Houses of Congress. These two extreme parties were the slaveowners of the South and the aboli- tionists of the No... ...ed, and with their numbers their power and their violence. In this way two parties have been formed who could not look on each other without hatred. A...

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The Writings of Abraham Lincoln in Seven Volumes Volume 5 of 7

By: Abraham Lincoln

...ion of Judge Douglas, and such were the opinions of the leading men of the Democratic Party. Even as late as the spring of 1856 Mr. Buchanan said, a s... ...e a concise statement of the dif- ference, as I understand it, between the Democratic and Re- publican parties, on the leading issues of the campaign.... ... dif- ference, as I understand it, between the Democratic and Re- publican parties, on the leading issues of the campaign. This question has been put ... ...ked out for this discussion. The difference between the Republican and the Democratic parties on the leading issues of this contest, as I understand i... ... this discussion. The difference between the Republican and the Democratic parties on the leading issues of this contest, as I understand it, is that ... ... contest, as I understand it, is that the former consider slavery a moral, social and political wrong, while the latter do not consider it either a mo... ...and political wrong, while the latter do not consider it either a moral, a social or a political wrong; and the action of each, as respects the growth... ...s. I will not affirm that the Demo- cratic party consider slavery morally, socially and politically right, though their tendency to that view has, in ... ... the difference, as I understand it, between the Republican and Democratic parties. My friends, I have endeavored to show you the logical con- sequenc...

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The Research Magnificent

By: H. G. Wells

...18 The Research Magnificent ence, and the other that fear is essentially a social instinct. He set himself upon these lines to study—what can we call ... ...an infantile characteristic. The fear felt by a tiger cub is cer- tainly a social emotion, that drives it back to the other cubs, to its mother and th... ...d can be replaced in a man’s imagination, how far some substitute for that social backing can be made to serve the same purpose in neutralizing fear. ... ...ssions that all ultimately re- solved themselves into an antagonism of the democratic and the aristocratic idea. And his part was, he found, to be the... ...e aristocratic idea. And his part was, he found, to be the exponent of the democratic idea. The next day he came down early, his talk with Benham stil... ... their inception. They were all more or less political careers. Whatever a democratic man may be, Prothero and he had decided that an aristocratic man... ...ays, he had been attentively inconspicuous in several really good week-end parties. He had spent a golden Octo- ber in North Italy with his mother, an... ...things, the only course for a sane man of honour was to stand out from the parties and try and get them back to sound issues again. There must be endl... ...“But I’m not going back to live in London in the old way, theatres, dinner-parties, chatter—” “Oh no! We aren’t going to do that sort of thing. We are...

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My Bondage and My Freedom by Frederick Douglass. With an Introduction. By James M'Cune Smith

By: Frederick Douglas

...ire admission of the same to the full privileges, political, religious and social, of manhood, requires power- ful effort on the part of the enthralle... ...quality to their white fellow citizens, in civil, religious, political and social rank, but they have also illustrated and adorned our common country ... ...tish and Irish audiences in public, and the refinement and elegance of the social circles in which he mingled, not only as an equal, but as a recogniz... ...e United States, even while organs of, and when supported by, anti-slavery parties, have, with a single exception, failed to pay expenses. Mr. Douglas... ...norable con- tinuance of the race. Marriage as imposing obligations on the parties to it—has no existence here, except in such hearts as are purer and... ...oceeded from it; and, on going a little in that direction, I came upon the parties engaged in the skirmish. Mr. Siever, the overseer, had hold of Nell... ... increase their stock of knowledge, to seek pleasure, to have their rough, democratic manners softened by contact with English aristocratic re- fineme... ...d I have crossed three thousand miles of the peril- ous deep. Instead of a democratic government, I am under a monarchical government. Instead of the ... ...ing with the lord mayor of Dublin. What a pity there was not some American democratic Christian at the door of his splendid mansion, to bark out at my...

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An Internationial Episode

By: Henry James

...g in the strong, crude light, and bedizened with gilded letter- ing, the multifarious awnings, banners, and streamers, the extraordinary number of omn... ... pretty young girls, dressed as if for a fete champetre, swaying to and fro in rocking chairs, fanning themselves with large straw fans, and enjoying ... ...e level tops intervened in lawnlike smoothness, it formed a charming complement to the drawing room. As such it was in course of use at the present mo... ...like that of her companion, was irritable. He, however, was also making up his mind that she was uncommonly pretty. “I daresay it’s very gay here, tha... ...t the Butterworths’. You have heard, at least, of the Butterworths. Bien. They did everything in the world for him—they turned themselves inside out. ... ...effecting a visit to the Tower of London. Suddenly it seemed as if the problem might be solved; the two ladies at Jones’s Hotel received a visit from ... .... Westgate. “All the women were decolletes, and many of the figures looked as if they could speak if they tried.” “Upon my word,” Lord Lambeth rejoine...

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The Life of John Sterling

By: Thomas Carlyle

...ntroversy he had got into with certain victorious Parliamentary offi- cial parties, while his own party lay vanquished, during what was called the Orm... ...der the warmth of increasing revenue and suc- cess, miscellaneous cheerful socialities and abundant specu- lations, chiefly political (and not John’s ... ...r intentions on either side. Nor, with all the Coleridge fermentation, was democratic Radicalism by any means given up;—though how it was to live if t... ...ng the outer sur- face of things without quite penetrating into the heart, democratic Liberalism, revolt against superstition and oppression, and help... ...terlings, among others, he had made acquaintance; became famil- iar in the social circle at South Place, and was much es- teemed there. With Madam Tor... ...to take up of this relation: and in the lodgings in Regent Street, and the democratico- literary element there, Torrijos became a very prominent, and ... ...ts. I have heard, it was then worth some ten thousand pounds a year to the parties interested. Anthony Sterling, John, and another a cousin of theirs ... ... all sail towards Malaga; and, on shore, all manner of troops and detached parties were in motion, to render a retreat to Gibraltar by land impossible... ...ke a charge of Cossacks, on occasion: but it was also eminently ingenious, social, guileless. We did all very well together: and Sterling and I walked...

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The World Set Free

By: H. G. Wells

... it would seem the world is growing accustomed to a steady glide to- wards social disintegration, and thinks that that too can go on continually and n... ...labour internationalism is closely bound up with conceptions of a profound social revo- lution. If world peace is to be attained through labour inter-... ...r- nationalism, it will have to be attained at the price of the completest social and economic reconstruction and by pass- ing through a phase of revo... ...nd whispered artful-looking solicitors, busily scrib- bling reporters, the parties to the case, expert witnesses, in- terested people, and a jostling ... ...very complete. In theory—and he abounded in theory—his manners were purely democratic. It was by sheer habit and inadvertency that he permitted Firmin... ...ge produce. They are bodies small enough as a rule to be run on a strictly democratic basis, and large enough to supply all the labour, except for a c...

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The C‘Sars

By: Thomas de Quincey

...ted, and even insusceptible of perfect union. It is in fact no vinculum of social organiza- tion which held them together, but the ideal vinculum of a... ...e been otherwise amongst a people who tried every thing by the standard of social value; never seeking for a canon of excel- lence, in man considered ... ...ut always and exclu- sively in man as a gregarious being, and designed for social uses and functions. Not man in his own peculiar nature, but man in h... ...autocracy. Even in the most prosper- ous days of the Roman State, when the democratic forces balanced, and were balanced by, those of the aristocracy,... ...ans he evaded a ceremonial of public honor which was burdensome to all the parties concerned in it. Sometimes, however, we find that men, careless of ... ...rdict, by the appearance in court of any great man on behalf of one of the parties interested: nor was such an interference with the course of private... ...espect which he might think proper to pay, must have been im- puted by all parties to the lingering superstitions of custom, to involuntary habit, to ... ...omises, *V ery remarkable it is, and a fact which speaks volumes as to the democratic constitution of the Roman army, in the midst of that aristocracy... ...tative office, which, as occasions arose, would have given some opening to democratic influences. But the consular office he left un- touched; because...

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The Pupil

By: Henry James

...ood places” as if they had been pick- pockets or strolling players. They had at Nice a villa, a carriage, a piano and a banjo, and they went to offici... ...th multitude of the enormous city and pretended they were proud of their position in it—it showed them “such a lot of life” and made them conscious of... ...hat had their forefathers—all decent folk, so far as he knew—done to them, or what had he done to them? Who had poisoned their blood with the fifth-ra... ...tons hadn’t re-appeared, the princes had scat- tered; wasn’t that the beginning of the end? Mrs. Moreen had lost her reckoning of the famous “days”; h... ...n. Flowers were all very well, but - Pemberton could complete the proposition. It was now positively conspicuous that in the long run the Moreens were...

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The Duchesse de Langeais, With an Episode under the Terror, The Illustrious Gaudissart, A Passion in the Desert, And the Hidden Masterpiece

By: Honoré de Balzac

...o come first and above all things else in your heart? In time past you put social success, yourself, heaven knows what, before him; now it is God, it ... ...er for reflection to those who are fain to observe or describe the various social zones; and pos- sibly an enquiry into the causes that bring about th... ...mmon- wealth, unless, indeed, experience is as meaningless for po- litical parties as it is for youth. In every age the great nobles, and the rich who... ...nded by this statement. An aristocracy is in a manner the intellect of the social system, as the middle classes and the proletariat may be said to be ... ..., and a consistency in 35 Balzac political and private life for which all parties involuntarily respected them. But, unfortunately, as so often happe... ...fended to admiration. Few women venture to be democrats; the at- titude of democratic champion is scarcely compatible with tyrannous feminine sway. Bu...

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The French Revolution a History Volume Two

By: Thomas Carlyle

...inger? The Clergy have means and material: means, of number, organization, social weight; a material, at lowest, of public ignorance, known to be the ... ...reak of Day Journal, though with declining sale. But why is Freron so hot, democratic; Freron, the King’s-friend’s Nephew? He has it by kind, that hea... ...d, grow and flourish; new every where bud forth. It is the sure symptom of Social Unrest: in such way, most infallibly of all, does Social Unrest exhi... ...o a known sort. Chapter 2.1.VII. Prodigies. To such length had the Contrat Social brought it, in be- lieving hearts. Man, as is well said, lives by fa... ...copious Rascality, on the pavement, with prayer for Salm: there do the two parties stand;—like chariots locked in a narrow thorough- fare; like locked... ...is gone, in these very days, to see old scenes in native Corsica, and what Democratic good can be done there. Royalty never executes the evasion-plan,... ... authority, no need of bul- lying and shouting, Saint-Antoine signifies to parties con- cerned there that its purpose is, To have this suspicious Stro... ...burst of dissolution and delirium. Sus- picion rules all minds: contending parties cannot now com- mingle; stand separated sheer asunder, eying one an...

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Babbitt

By: Sinclair Lewis

...horescent dial. Babbitt was proud of being awakened by such a rich device. Socially it was almost as creditable as buying expensive cord tires. He sul... ... she was alive. After a rather thorough discussion of all the domestic and social aspects of towels she apologized to Babbitt for his having an alcoho... ...d her dad are millionaires! I suppose you’re trying to rub in your exalted social position! Well, let me tell you that your revered paternal ancestor,... .... Vecchia was not a caterer, he was The Caterer of Zenith. Most coming-out parties were held in the white and gold ballroom of the Maison Vecchia; at ... ...d given him the beginning of a repu- tation for oratory, so the Republican-Democratic Central Committee sent him to the Seventh Ward and South Ze- nit... ... and it was always thinning into silence. Despite their reso- lution to be democratic they divided into two sets: the men with dress-clothes and the m... ... to Max Kruger, the banker, “Yes, we’ll put up Sir Gerald Doak.” Babbitt’s democratic love 169 Sinclair Lewis for titles became a rich relish. “You k... ...e of those quiet evenings that are often so much more enjoyable than noisy parties where everybody talks at once and doesn’t really settle down to-nic... ...tt had heard stories of what the Athletic Club called “goings on” at young parties; of girls “parking” their corsets in the dressing-room, of “cud- dl...

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The Bostonians

By: Henry James

...; perhaps he would like to go with her. It wasn’t a party—Olive didn’t go to parties; it was one of those weird meetings she was so fond of. ‘What kin... ... been to a party since Mississippi seceded.’ ‘No; Miss Birdseye doesn’t give parties. She’s an ascetic.’ ‘Oh, well, we have had our dinner,’ Ransom re... ...e as hers, but she seemed to him a revelation of a class, and a multitude of socialistic figures, of names and episodes that he had heard of, grouped t... ...rd a public speaker, with an effort of respiration in the thick air in which social re forms are usually discussed. She talked continually, in a voic... ...so anxious to meet Mrs. Farrinder, she gave the young man a delicate, dirty, democratic little hand, looking at him kindly, as she could not help doin... ...d to generalise in any way, or supposed to have come up for any purpose more social than to see what Miss Birdseye wanted this time. By nine 24 The B... ...t being affiliated to the exclusive set and having invitations to the smaller parties, which were the real test; it was a mercy for her that she had no... ...d in his measure, and on behalf of a vigilant public opinion, the pride of a democratic State, to the great end of preventing the American citizen fro...

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When the Sleeper Wakes

By: H. G. Wells

...the city ways for various public services. Light and so forth.” “W as it a social trouble—that—in the great roadway place? How are you governed? Have ... ...“Several?” “About fourteen.” “I don’t understand.” “Very probably not. Our social order will probably seem very complex to you. To tell you the truth,... ...st understand,” began Howard abruptly, avoid- ing Graham’s eyes, “that our social order is very complex. A half explanation, a bare unqualified statem... ...e now. He was in some way the owner of half the world, and great political parties were fighting to possess him. On the one hand was the White Council... ...he cried. “I do not understand!” He had slipped out between the contending parties into this liberty of the twilight. What would happen next? What was... ...ght by capable rich men. Socialistic and Popu- lar, Reactionary and Purity Parties were all at last mere Stock Exchange counters, selling their princi... ...rol them?” The Surveyor-General did, “entirely.” Now, Graham, in his later democratic days, had taken a keen interest in these and his questioning qui... ...has been full of surprises to me. In the old days we dreamt of a wonderful democratic life, of a time when all men would be equal and happy.” Ostrog l... ...hopes been vain?” “What do you mean?” said Ostrog. “Hopes?” “I came from a democratic age. And I find an aristocratic tyranny!” “Well,—but you are the...

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Autobiographic Sketches Selections, Grave and Gay

By: Thomas de Quincey

...ar. But its own class did not ordinarily occupy that position in regard to social influence which could en- able them rapidly to diffuse the knowledge... ...en- able them rapidly to diffuse the knowledge of a writer. A reader whose social standing is moderate may communicate his views upon a book or a writ... ...ion, would fill him with twofold astonishment, as interpreting equally the social valuation of the English merchant, and also the social valuation of ... ...oon. Stones were the implements of warfare; and by continual practice both parties became expert in throwing them. The origin of the feud it is scarce... ... in my brother’s code of morals, that, supposing a contest between any two parties, of which one possessed an article, whilst the other was better abl... ...y con- demned as mad; and the general pursuit commenced, which brought all parties (hunters and game) sweeping so wildly past the quiet grounds of Gre... ...t often the most aristocratic, yet also, for many noble purposes, the most democratic of lands. 2 Five years ago, during the carnival of universal an... ... an unfortunate reserve of manner. Whilst, on the contrary, Mr. Fox, ultra democratic in his principles and frank in his address, was repulsively aris...

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One of Our Conquerors

By: George Meredith

... it freshly for a trifle; and the hoar-headed nineteenth-century billow of democratic ire craved the word to be set swelling. ‘Am I the fellow you mea... ...mercenaries! And that lands me in Red Republicanism, a hop and a skip from Socialism! said Mr. Radnor, and chuckled ironi- cally at the natural decliv... ...their poultry, cows, cream. And a certain influence one has in the country socially. I make my stand on a home— not empty punctilio.’ 22 One of Our C... ...could, considering their immense extension; and except for the sen- sitive social name, he was of single-minded purpose. 37 George Meredith T urning ... ...g; or when he was not too distinctly seen by her to be shooting at all the parties of her beloved England, beneath the wicked semblance of shielding e... ... 61 George Meredith The young gentleman introduced to the Radnor Concert- parties by Lady Grace Halley as the Hon. Dudley Sowerby, had to bear the si... ...view of safety from intrusion, I can admit-speaking humbly. But one of the parties—I had a wish to gratify him—is a lover of old English times and hab... ... ‘Court! my girl? But the arduous duties are over for the season. We are a democratic people retaining the seductions of monarchy, as a friend says; a... ...iors; and, over this country at least, require the refresh- ment, that the democratic sprouts in them may be recon- ciled with aristocracy. Do not lis...

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The Deputy of Arcis

By: Honoré de Balzac

...h of his political ideas, the colonel had lived almost entirely outside of social life. Rising with the sun, he devoted himself to horticulture; he ad... ...tion. That affair divides to this day the arrondissement of Arcis into two parties; one of which declares the inno- cence of the condemned; the other ... ...er to influence the masses, should say and resay this truth,—to hoard is a social crime. The deliberate hoarding of a province arrests industrial life... ...ll appeared to belong to a man who had dropped upon Arcis from the highest social sphere. The stranger, no doubt fatigued, did not show himself for a ... ...would the old notary not have made? With the legitimist and the republican parties who could have no weight in the election, except that of increasing... ... 123 Balzac in Paris in 1829-1830. They lived in great state and gave fine parties. I myself met them in Italy.” “But their name?” I said. “De Lanty,”... ...us conservatives, whereas Monsieur Dorlange inclines in a marked degree to democratic principles. This unexpected superiority in my problematical foll... ...e child told the truth. She only said, with her blunt simplicity, what our democratic customs still allow us to put in practice, though they forbid us... ...e lead in our discus- sions. In this little club the prevailing opinion is democratic; it is represented under all its aspects, the phalansterian Uto-...

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The Age of Innocence

By: Edith Wharton

...ns had the im- mense advantage of enabling one (with a playful allusion to democratic principles) to scramble into the first Brown con- veyance in the... ...eton. He meant her (thanks to his enlightening companionship) to develop a social tact and readiness of wit enabling her to hold her own with the most... ...regrettable in the Beaufort past. Mrs. Archer, who was fond of coining her social philosophy into axioms, had once said: “We all have our pet common p... ...r thoughts, he simply replied: “Oh, well, there’s always a phase of family parties to be gone through when one gets engaged, and the sooner it’s over ... ...eature whose soul’s custodian he was to be. That terrifying product of the social system he belonged to and believed in, the young girl who knew nothi... ...to give her a friendly warning about allowing the Duke to carry her off to parties with him. I don’t know if you’ve heard—” Mrs. Archer produced an in... ...Archer produced an indulgent smile. “Has the Duke been carrying her off to parties?” 64 The Age of Innocence “Y ou know what these English grandees a...

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Sartor Resartus: The Life and Opinions of Herr Teufelsdrockh

By: Thomas Carlyle

... were got in, presented difficulties. Why mention our disquisitions on the Social Contract, on the Standard of Taste, on the Migrations of the Herring... ...everal; meaning thereby that, one day, he would probably be hanged for his democratic sentiments. Wo steckt doch der Schalk? added they, looking round... ...nead and publish was other than medicinal and sacred. In such environment, social, domestic, physical, did Teufelsdrockh, at the time of our acquainta... ...ed Armies, and cashiering most Kings and Senates, and creating a whole new Democratic world: he had invented the Art of Print- ing. The first ground h... ...d shrine for the Holy in man. Clothes gave us individuality, distinctions, social polity; Clothes have made Men of us; they are threatening to make Cl... ...nd these Chapters, that it may be thrown out as a pertinent ques- tion for parties concerned, Whether or not a good English Translation thereof might ... ...inistry and Opposition, and that generous conflict of 176 Sartor Resartus Parties, mind warming itself against mind in their mutual wrestle for the P... ...editary resources, and is strong by union; whereas the Drudges, split into parties, have as yet no ral- lying-point; or at best only co-operate by mea...

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Diana of the Crossways

By: George Meredith

...his ‘handsome, lively, witty’ apparition as a woman having po- litical and social views of her own, he would not, one fan- cies, have been so stingles... ...lent gen- eral manager, if no genius in statecraft. But he was careless of social opinion, unbuttoned, and a laugher. We know that he could be chivalr... ...educed her to think so positively. Her main personal experience was in the social class which is primitively venatorial still, canine under its polish... ... of us we fail in growth, there is, you are aware, an unfailing aboriginal democratic old monster that waits to pull us down; certainly the branch, po... ... coming swiftly to some solution, constituted her the chief of the pair of democratic rebels in questions that clamoured for instant solution. By dint... ... means ever a trifle beyond it, and gave 63 George Meredith choice dinner-parties to the most eminent. His jealousy slum- bered. Having ideas of a se... ... Redworth of the unexampled concert of the guests at Mrs. Warwick’s dinner parties. He had met on one occasion the Esquarts, the Pettigrews, Mr. Percy... ... carriages one after another to choose her com- pany for her. In those pre-democratic blissful days before the miry Deluge, the opinion of the require... ...itmonby too, no doubt a celebrity, was the right- hand man at these dinner-parties of Mrs. Warwick. Where will not men go to be flattered by a pretty ...

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