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Social Democratic Parties (X)

       
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The Writings of Abraham Lincoln in Seven Volumes Volume 7 of 7

By: Abraham Lincoln

... property, except as to slaves and in property cases where rights of third parties shall have intervened, and upon the condition that every such perso... ...ing of the Belgians, to whose arbitration the question was referred by the parties. The subject was thor- oughly and patiently examined by that justl... ...ally as I first put it. Henderson, and especially Brown, believe that the social influence of St. Louis would inevitably tell injuriously upon Gener... ...feiture and condemnation of the vessel and cargo, and the exclusion of all parties concerned from any further privilege of entering the United States ... ... be decided in November. There is no pro- gram offered by any wing of the Democratic party but that must result in the permanent destruction of the U... ...thmetic will prove to any man that the rebel armies cannot be destroyed by Democratic strategy. It would sacrifice all the white men of the North to ... ...men, most of them under arms, defending and acquiring Union territory. The Democratic strategy demands that these forces be dis- banded, and that the ... ...ce has been freely opened with Liberia, and it gives us a pleasing view of social and political progress in that republic. It may be expected to deri... ...ith hearty good-will the conventional laws which regulate com- mercial and social intercourse among the Western nations. Owing to the peculiar situati...

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Autobiography of a Pocket-Handkerchief

By: James Fenimore Cooper

... that system of patriarchal rule which lies at the foundation of the whole social structure. Alas! in the case of the excellent Adrienne, this conseil... ... frequent that centre of civilization. The only difference is, that in the social pictures offered by what are called cities, the cancans are in the s... ...was the cote droit, and which the cote gauche. Thus completely deranged as parties, we took to discussing philosophical matters in general; an occupat... ...ich seemed barely large enough to contain so great a man’s moustaches, the parties understood each other without un- necessary phrases, and I was, at ... ...ss, nor is it any evidence of acquaintance with the intricate machinery of social greatness and a lofty civilization. These gradations in attain- ment... ...s to an- other, though no one could presume to communicate the fact to the parties most interested. In a commercial town, like New Y ork, the failure ... ... great influence in New Y ork, doubtless by way of expiation for the rigid democratical notions that so universally pervade its soci- ety. And here I ... ...ical conversions to answer for. It is such a thor- ough development of the democratic principle, that the faith of few believers is found strong enoug... ...e of a room filled with company, and every thing will present a vulgar and democratic appearance; or, vice versa, you shall occupy a place among the o...

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The Soul of a Bishop

By: H. G. Wells

...du- ate days he had said a thing or two in the modern vein, af- fected the socialism of William Morris and learnt some Swinburne by heart, it was out ... ...s home. He had been kind, popular, and endlessly active. His undergraduate socialism had expanded simply and sincerely into a theory of administrative... ...g when King George was being crowned. Close upon that event came a wave of social discontent, the great railway strike, a curious sense of social and ... ...le and mischievous. The suffragettes became extraordinarily malignant; the democratic movement went rotten with sabotage and with a cant of being “reb... ...indolent, the French decadent, the Russians barbaric, the Americans basely democratic; the rest of the world was the “White man’s Burthen”; the clear ... ... these ridiculous or wicked little kings and emperors, and these political parties, and these policies and conspiracies, and this nationalist nonsense...

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Hunting Sketches

By: Anthony Trollope

...ness. His hunt- ing requires from him everything, his time, his money, his social hours, his rest, his sweet morning sleep; nay, his very dinners have... ...ne by a crowd; but men who meet together to do wicked things meet in small parties. Men cannot gamble in the hunting-field, and drinking there is more... ... adds greatly to his grandeur; and he is one of those who, in spite of the democratic tenderness of the age, may still be said to go about as a king a...

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The French Revolution a History Volume Three

By: Thomas Carlyle

...in the last days of October, Frau Forster, a daughter of Heyne’s, somewhat democratic, walking out of the Gate of Mentz with her Husband, finds French... ...ders far over the marches; and likewise she has shattered her own internal Social Constitution, even to the minutest fibre of it, into wreck and disso... ...better or worse luck: the wreck and dissolution must reshape itself into a social Arrangement as it can and may. But as for this Na- tional Convention... ...ing; shaking off daily (so to speak), and trampling into the dust, its old social garnitures, ways of thinking, rules of existing; and cheerfully danc... ...l of Lepelletier: it was the last act these men ever did with concert! All Parties and figures of Opinion, that agitate this distracted France and its... ...ible and incompatible. In plainer words, this France must needs split into Parties; each of which seeking to make itself good, contradiction, exas- pe... ...seeking to make itself good, contradiction, exas- peration will arise; and Parties on Parties find that they cannot work together, cannot exist togeth...

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The Note Book of an English Opium-Eater

By: Thomas de Quincey

...den difficulties, and most flexibly adapting himself to all variet- ies of social life. Williams was a man of middle stature (five feet seven and a-ha... ...g it is, ‘my employer.’ Now, in the United States, such an expres- sion of democratic hauteur, though disagreeable as a need- less proclamation of ind... ...ly have been noticed; but now, when the first question and the last in all social meetings turned upon the Marrs, and their unknown murderer, it was a... ...een heard from the lips of Mrs. Williamson, is due to the positions of the parties as I have sketched them. Coming behind Mrs. Williamson, unseen ther... ...them desperate: their own little property had been swallowed up in a large social catastrophe, and so- ciety at large they looked upon as accountable ... ...nal a of ‘sopha,’ i.e., Wronguh), has been found a wrong-headed man by all parties, and in a venial degree is, perhaps, a stu- pid man; but he moves a... ...ptation and strife thrown by the goddess of faction between two infuriated parties. ‘Cato,’ coming from a man without Parliamentary connections, would... ...l more extravagantly exalted them. On this account it is just to look upon democratic or popu- lar politics as identical in the 17th century with patr...

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Memorials and Other Papers

By: Thomas de Quincey

...to utter any opinion what- ever on the religious position of the two great parties. It is suffi- cient for entire sympathy with the royal Swede, that ... ...ith gen- eral politics (meaning by general not personal politics) and with social philosophy. At Laxton, indeed; it was that I first saw Godwin’s “Pol... ...e original quarto edition, with all its virus as yet undiluted of raw anti-social Jacobinism. At Laxton it was that I first saw the entire aggregate l... ...r philosophic inference. One hundred years ago, such was the difficulty of social intercourse, sim- ply from the difficulty of locomotion (though even... ...n the kingdom. Many elegant and pretty women there naturally were in these parties; but undoubtedly our two Laxton bar- onesses shone advantageously a... ...ounds, paid down according to the rate agreed on by the lawyers of the two parties; or, strictly speaking, quarrelled on between the adverse factions;... ...e, the tribunitian office, namely, that it was a popular mode of leav- ing democratic organs untouched, whilst he neutralized their democratic functio...

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The Lesser Bourgeoisie (The Middle Classes)

By: Honoré de Balzac

...ng for 12 The Lesser Bourgeoisie him to let herself be mistaken as to his social value. Thuillier and his sister were children of the head porter at ... ...on, for a cipher was needed. The government was afraid of displeasing both parties in the Chamber by selecting a man from either side; it therefore go... ...natures is a pharos, which illumines to their eyes the dark low corners of social existence. Superior to her brother both in mind and energy, Brigitte... ...gitte understood, far better than her brother could explain it to her, the social crisis which presently ex- 17 Balzac tinguished their common hopes.... ...ay , though it was quickly forgotten during the events of 1815. The guilty parties hav- ing escaped detection, Lemprun wished to make up the loss; but... ... but answered all things,—progress, steam, bitumen, National guard, order, democratic element, spirit of associa- 33 Balzac tion, legality, movement,... ...s of the government are in question. He admits, with his chosen paper, the democratic element, but refuses in conversation all compact with the republ... ...lican spirit to him means 1793, rioting, the Terror, and agrarian law. The democratic element is the de- velopment of the lesser bourgeoisie, the reig... ...tener, and ended by appearing ev- ery Sunday; he was invited to all dinner-parties, and became at last so familiar in the house that whenever he came ...

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The Glimpses of the Moon

By: Edith Wharton

...by an equal respect for that of others; she had steered too long among the social reefs and shoals not to know how narrow is the passage that leads to... ...rcy of the influences from which she thought she had escaped. In the queer social whirligig from which she had so lately fled, it seemed natural enoug... ...assions, her artless mix- 84 The Glimpses of the Moon ture of amorous and social interests, was a woman with a pur- pose, a creature who fulfilled he... ...r herself continuing there the life of heavy county responsibilities, dull parties, laborious duties, weekly church- going, and presiding over local c... ...ons; and neither, after a time, could Mr. Hicks, who found the Prince more democratic than anyone he had ever known at Apex City, and was immensely in... ...rs—had smilingly hinted that their Serene Highnesses, though so thoroughly democratic and unceremonious, were yet accustomed to inspecting in advance ... ...the 134 The Glimpses of the Moon plea that the Princess Mother liked cosy parties and begged her hosts that there should never be more than thirty at... ...eminding her, when she “seated” her din- 160 The Glimpses of the Moon ner-parties, that Dukes ranked higher than Princes. No—the job was decidedly in...

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Twilight in Italy

By: D. H. Lawrence

...destruction of the Self. So on we go, active in science and mechanics, and social reform. But we have exhausted ourselves in the process. We have foun... ...e male spirit, which would subdue the immediate flesh to some conscious or social pur- pose, is overthrown. The woman in her maternity is the law- giv... ...pirit from the self, the reaction from the great aristocratic to the great democratic principle. An ordinary instinctive man, in Hamlet’s position, wo... ...h only the looser women go, with these reckless young men. He also gets up parties of pleasure, and is chiefly responsible for the coming of the playe... ...orce public opinion. Be- tween the clerical party and the radicals and the socialists, what canons were left that were absolute? Besides, these wild v... ...hould any one stay there! I went on up the pass itself. There were various parties of visitors on the roads and tracks, people from towns incon- gruou...

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Women in Love

By: D. H. Lawrence

...er. It would be queer to meet again down here in the Midlands, where their social standing was so diverse, after they had known each other on terms of... ...ality in the houses of sundry acquaintances in town. For Gudrun had been a social success, and had her friends among the slack aristoc- racy that keep... ...ts. Hermione knew herself to be well-dressed; she knew her- self to be the social equal, if not far the superior, of anyone she was likely to meet in ... ..., handsome young Englishman, Alexander tall and the handsome politi- cian, democratic and lucid, Hermione strange like a long Cassandra, and the women... ...highest of flowers, hence its charm.’ ‘No,’ she cried, ‘no—never. It isn’t democratic.’ ‘No,’ he admitted. ‘It’s the golden mob of the proletariat, su... ...ink to a conclusion, Gerald jumped to a conclusion. He abandoned the whole democratic-equal- ity problem as a problem of silliness. What mattered was ... .... She thought of the wives and daughters of the pit-managers, their tennis-parties, and their terrible struggles to be supe- rior each to the other, i...

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The American

By: Henry James

...your hotel.” “Oh yes, I should like to learn French,” Newman went on, with democratic confidingness. “Hang me if I should ever have thought of it! I t... ... good-nature, and a part of his 28 The American instinctive and genuinely democratic assumption of every one’s right to lead an easy life. If a shagg... ...t, but it amused him, and the old man’s decent forlornness appealed to his democratic instincts. The as- sumption of a fatality in misery always irrit... ...tranger, who, without a suspicion or a question, had admitted him to equal social rights. He compromised, and declared that while it was obvious that ... ...d purchase handsome things; but he was no more conscious, individually, of social pressure than he admitted the exist- ence of such a thing as an obli... ...Tristram, in accor- dance with the latter’s estimate of what he called his social position. When Newman learned that his social po- sition was to be t... ...was a mode of recreation to which he was much addicted. He liked making up parties of his friends and conducting them to the theatre, and taking them ... ...t have them if you will mind what I tell you—I alone—and not talk to other parties.” He passed his arm into that of his companion, and the two walked ... ... scruple simply because I consider your brother and you two very different parties. I see no connection between you. Your brother was ashamed of you. ...

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Aaron's Rod

By: D. H. Lawrence

...poor, they were rather excited. But they belonged to a set which looked on social triumphs as a downfall that one allows one- self. The two men, Lilly... ...mportant box at the opera without experiencing the strange intoxication of social pre-eminence, it is just as impossible to be there without some feel... ...ent hours with his tailor. But instead of being a soldier he was a sort of socialist, and a red-hot revolutionary of a very ineffectual sort. “Good la... ...kirmished. “Yes. I was on guard one day when the Queen gave one of her tea-parties to the blind. Awful affair. But the children are awfully nice child... ...lt a little dim and superficial surprise. He had fallen into country house parties before, but never into quite such a plushy sense of riches. He felt... ... a strange back-water. And the old families are very proud still, in these democratic days. They have a great opinion of themselves, I am told.” “Well... ...casion. He made the two elderly people uncomfortable with his silence: his democratic silence, Miss Wade might have said. However, Miss Wade lived out... ....— Oh, they’ll all come to realise it, when they’ve had a bit more of this democratic washer-women business.” Levison was laughing, with a slight snee...

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The Writings of Abraham Lincoln in Seven Volumes Volume 6 of 7

By: Abraham Lincoln

...l crime, it declares forfeiture extending be- yond the lives of the guilty parties; whereas the Constitution of the United States declares that “no at... ...be thus engaged; and I think a reasonable time should be provided for such parties to appear and have per- sonal hearings. Similar provisions are not ... ...cupations and habits of the American people, has necessarily disturbed the social condition, and affected very deeply the prosperity, of the nations w... ... from taking part in any con- troversy between foreign states, and between parties or fac- tions in such states. We have attempted no propagandism and... ...nredeemed promise of more than half a year’s standing. A. LINCOLN. FURTHER DEMOCRATIC PARTY CRITICISM TO M. BIRCHARD AND OTHERS. W ASHINGTON, D. C., J... ...M. BIRCHARD, DA VID A. HOUK, et al: GENTLEMEN:—The resolutions of the Ohio Democratic State convention, which you present me, together with your intro... ...being in position and argu- ment mainly the same as the resolutions of the Democratic meeting at Albany, New Y ork, I refer you to my response to the ...

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A Little Tour in France

By: Henry James

...or healthy suspense. He is surrounded by fine old traditions, reli- gious, social, architectural, culinary; and he may have the satisfaction of feelin... ... advance. There was one waiter in especial who was the most ac- complished social being I have ever encountered; from morning till night he kept up an... ...nd of those pleasures which proceed from the presence of women in whom the social art is both instinctive and acquired. The women of that period were,... ...ter of his own. This trifling incident reminded me afresh that France is a democratic country. I think I received an admonition to the same effect fro... .... In the year 436, Theodoric, King of the Visigoths, superseded both these parties; and it is during his occupation that the inner enceinte was raised... ...n all the others. It reminded me, as one is reminded at every turn, of the democratic con- ditions of French life: a man of the people, with a wife en...

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The Europeans

By: Henry James

...He possessed what is called the pictorial sense; and this first glimpse of democratic man- ners stirred the same sort of attention that he would have ... ...thing absolutely touching in that combination of paternal lib- erality and social considerateness which marked Mr. Wentworth’s deportment. It was most... ...itement in it as at first. “What ought one to do?” she continued. “To give parties, to go to the theatre, to read novels, to keep late hours?” “I don’... ...e was certainly the person who had most adequately gauged her capacity for social intercourse. Before long it became apparent to him that the Baroness... ...zie, saw on his side no reason to inter- pose. It seemed to him a graceful social law that Clifford and his sister should become engaged; he himself w...

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A Personal Record

By: Joseph Conrad

...tions in motion and upheaved the dry, hard ground on which rests our whole social fabric. There’s “virtue” for you if you like! … Of course the accent... ... quartermasters reaped a harvest of small change from personally conducted parties. But when the move was made—that move which carried us some mile an... ... calm fortitude the cruel trials of a life reflecting all the national and social misfortunes of the community, she realized the highest conceptions o... ...xpectation was worth the risk, goodness only knows. However, these Cossack parties, in most cases wandering without an officer, were known to guard th... ...en he married the widow, all his visible fortune consisted (apart from his social qualities) in a smart four-horse turnout with two servants, with who... ...mperance association or for the post of official troubadour to some lordly democratic institution such as the London County Council, for instance. The... ...an easy going “Let’s see. H’m. Suppose you tell me all you know of charter-parties.” He kept it up in that style all through, wandering off in the sha...

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Some Reminiscences

By: Joseph Conrad

...tions in motion and upheaved the dry, hard ground on which rests our whole social fabric. There’s “virtue” for you if you like!… Of course the accent ... ...ter-mas- ters reaped a harvest of small change from person- ally conducted parties. But when the move was made—that move which carried us some mile an... ... calm fortitude the cruel trials of a life reflecting all the national and social misfortunes of the community, she realised the highest conceptions o... ...ec- tation was worth the risk, goodness only knows. However, these Cossack parties, in most cases wan- dering without an officer, were known to guard ... ...en he married the widow, all his visible fortune consisted (apart from his social qualities) in a smart four-horse turn-out with two servants, with wh... ...erance association or for the post of official trouba- dour to some lordly democratic institution such as the London County Council, for instance. The... ...an easy-going “Let’s see. H’m. Suppose you tell me all you know of charter-parties.” He kept it up in that style all through, wandering off in the sha...

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The First Men in the Moon

By: H. G. Wells

... the matter. I assured him we might make wealth enough to work any sort of social revolution we fan- cied, we might own and order the whole world. I t... ... paid for polar expe- ditions. And if anything goes wrong there are relief parties. But this—it’s just firing ourselves off the world for nothing.” “C... ... passions and new weapons— now it upsets your religion, now it upsets your social ideas, now it whirls you off to desolation and misery!” “Anyhow, it’... ...brought before my mind, in its sleepless activity, in its intelligence and social organisation, in its structure, and more particularly in the fact th... ...e sort of men. But who thinks? Who governs?’ “I gave him an outline of the democratic method. “When I had done he ordered cooling sprays upon his brow...

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The Portrait of a Lady

By: Henry James

... scarce have pretended to found the best of his appeal for her on her high social position.) It is an example exactly of the deep difficulty braved—th... ...o, they’ll be firm,” the old man rejoined; “they’ll not be affected by the social and political changes I just referred to.” “You mean they won’t be a... ...rope. There was nothing flighty about Mrs. Touchett, but she recognised no social superiors, and, judging the great ones of the earth in a way that sp... ...quite realise. You and I, you know, we know what it is to have lived under democratic institutions: I always thought them very comfortable, but I was ... ...Turner and Assyrian bulls were a poor substi- tute for the literary dinner-parties at which she had hoped to meet the genius and renown of Great Brita... ... Gardencourt; the days grew shorter and there was an end to the pretty tea-parties on the lawn. But our young woman had long indoor conversations with... ...nd Isabel’s answering quite another. He knew she had lis- tened to several parties, as his father would have said, but had made them listen in return;...

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