World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Three-box styling

Article Id: WHEBN0004943676
Reproduction Date:

Title: Three-box styling  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Hatchback, Sedan (automobile), Station wagon, Toyota LiteAce, Car model
Collection: Car Body Styles
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Three-box styling

Typical pillar configurations of a sedan (three box), station wagon (two box) and hatchback (two box) from the same model range.
A three-box coupé in notchback form, the Fiat 124
A three-box hatchback in notchback form—with its vestigial third box, the European Ford Escort
A three-box sedan, the Renault Dauphine, with articulated engine (rear), passenger and cargo (front) volumes.

Three-box design is a broad automotive styling term describing a coupé, sedan, notchback or hatchback where—when viewed in profile—principal volumes are articulated into three separate compartments or boxes: engine, passenger and cargo.[1]

Three-box designs are highly variable. The Renault Dauphine is a three-box that carries its engine in the rear and its cargo up front. The styling of the Škoda Octavia integrates a hatchback with the articulation of a three-box. This style was later used by its larger Škoda Superb, which marketed as the TwinDoor, within the liftgate operable as a trunk lid or as a full hatchback. As with the third generation European Ford Escort (also a hatchback), the third box may be vestigial. And three-box styling need not be boxy: Car Design News calls the fluid and rounded Fiat Linea a three-box design[2]—and most examples of the markedly bulbous styling of the ponton genre are three-box designs.

Contents

  • One-box design 1
  • Two-box design 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4

One-box design

One-box, also called a monospace, mono-box or monovolume configuration,[3] is a design that pulls the base of a vehicle's A-pillars forward,[3][4] softening any distinction between separate volumes and enclosing the entire interior of a vehicle in a single form—as with the Toyota Prius, Renault Espace, 1992 Renault Twingo I, Tata Nano and Japanese microvans amongst others.

Two-box design

Two-box designs articulate a volume for engine and a volume that combines passenger and cargo volumes, e.g., station wagons or (three or five-door) hatchbacks, and minivans like the Chrysler minivan.[4][5]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Car Design Glossary - Part 2: One-Box (Monospace or Monovolume)".  
  2. ^ "Fiat Linea".  
  3. ^ a b "Car Design Glossary - Part 2: One-Box (Monospace or Monovolume)".  
  4. ^ a b Mike Mueller (2003). American Cars of the '50s. Crestline Imprints.  
  5. ^ "Car Design Glossary - Part 2: One-Box (Monospace or Monovolume)".  
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.