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Gilded flicker

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Title: Gilded flicker  
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Subject: Colaptes, List of fauna of the Lower Colorado River Valley, Fauna of the Sonoran Desert, Woodpeckers, Sibley-Monroe checklist 2
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Gilded flicker

Gilded flicker
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Piciformes
Family: Picidae
Genus: Colaptes
Species: C. chrysoides
Binomial name
Colaptes chrysoides
(Malherbe, 1845)

The gilded flicker (Colaptes chrysoides) is a large-sized woodpecker (mean length of 29 cm (11 in)) of the Sonoran, Yuma, and eastern Colorado Desert regions of the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico including all of the Baja Peninsula except the extreme northwestern region. Golden yellow underwings distinguish the gilded flicker from the northern flicker found within the same region, which have red underwings.

Contents

  • Habitat 1
  • References 2
  • Gallery 3
  • Further reading 4
  • External links 5

Habitat

The gilded flicker most frequently builds its nest hole in a majestic saguaro cactus, excavating a nest hole nearer the top than the ground.[2] The cactus defends itself against water loss into the cavity of the nesting hole by secreting sap that hardens into a waterproof structure that is known as a saguaro boot.[3] Northern flickers, on the other hand, nest in riparian trees and very rarely inhabit saguaros. Gilded flickers occasionally hybridize with northern flickers in the narrow zones where their range and habitat overlap.

References

  1. ^  
  2. ^ "Gilded Flicker". National Audubon Society. Retrieved 2011-01-24. Much of the Gilded Flicker's breeding biology needs study. Nesting begins in early April in the United States, and pair bonds appear to last for the breeding season. 
  3. ^ Mark Elbroch; Eleanor Marie Marks; C. Diane Boretos (2001). Bird tracks and sign. Stackpole Books. p. 311.  

Gallery

Further reading

  • Corman, T. E., Wise-Gervais, C. Arizona Breeding Bird Atlas. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press. (2005) ISBN 0-8263-3379-6.
  • National Geographic Society Field Guide to the Birds of North America, Third Edition. Washington, D.C.: National Geographic Society. (1999) ISBN 0-7922-7451-2.

External links

  • Gilded flicker photo gallery VIREO
  • Photo-High Res; Article borderland-tours
  • Photo-High Res; Article tsuru-bird.net
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