World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV

Article Id: WHEBN0010962251
Reproduction Date:

Title: Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Clinical psychology, Mental health, History of mental disorders, Classification of mental disorders
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV

The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I) is a diagnostic exam used to determine DSM-IV Axis I disorders (major mental disorders). The SCID-II is a diagnostic exam used to determine Axis II disorders (personality disorders). There are at least 700 published studies in which the SCID was the diagnostic instrument used. Major parts of the SCID have been translated into other languages, including Danish, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish, and Zulu.

An Axis I SCID assessment with a psychiatric patient usually takes between 1 and 2 hours, depending on the complexity of the subject's psychiatric history and their ability to clearly describe episodes of current and past symptoms. A SCID with a non-psychiatric patient takes 1/2 hour to 1-1/2 hours. (See editions below.) A SCID-II personality assessment takes about 1/2 to 1 hour.

The instrument was designed to be administered by a mental health professional, for example a psychologist or psychiatrist. This must be someone who has relevant professional training and has had experience performing unstructured, open-ended question, diagnostic evaluations. However, for the purposes of some research studies, non-clinician research assistants, who have extensive experience with the study population in question, and who have demonstrated competence, have been trained to use the SCID. The less clinical experience and specific education the potential interviewer has had, the more training is required.

DSM-IV editions of SCID-I and SCID-II

There are several editions of the SCID-I addressed to different audiences:[1]

  • Three Research Versions:
    • Patient Edition (SCID-I/P)[2]
    • Patient Edition, with psychotic screen (SCID-I/P W/ PSY SCREEN)[3]
    • Non-patient Edition (SCID-I/NP),[4]
  • A Clinical Trials Version (SCID-CT)[5]
  • Clinician Version (SCID-CV)[6]

The SCID-II for DSM-IV comes in a single edition.[7]

SCID versions for DSM-5 are under development. See the SCID website for updates.

DSM-III editions of SCID-I and SCID-II

The DSM-III SCID had one edition per axis: SCID-P/SCID-NP[8] and SCID-II.[9]

The reliability and validity of the SCID for DSM-III-R has been reported in several published studies. With regard to reliability, the range in reliability is enormous, depending on the type of the sample and research methodology (i.e., joint vs. test-retest, multi-site vs. single site with raters who have worked together, etc.)

SCID-D

The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative disorders (SCID-D)[10] is widely used to diagnose dissociative disorders, especially in research settings. This interview takes about 30 minutes to 1.5 hours, depending on individual's experiences. The SCID-D has been translated into Dutch and used in the Netherlands.[11]

See also

References

  1. ^ http://www.scid4.org/info/refscid.html
  2. ^ First, Michael B., Spitzer, Robert L, Gibbon Miriam, and Williams, Janet B.W.: Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Axis I Disorders, Research Version, Patient Edition. (SCID-I/P) New York: Biometrics Research, New York State Psychiatric Institute, November 2002.
  3. ^ First, Michael B., Spitzer, Robert L, Gibbon Miriam, and Williams, Janet B.W.: Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Axis I Disorders, Research Version, Patient Edition With Psychotic Screen (SCID-I/P W/ PSY SCREEN) New York: Biometrics Research, New York State Psychiatric Institute, November 2002.
  4. ^ First, Michael B., Spitzer, Robert L, Gibbon Miriam, and Williams, Janet B.W.: Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Axis I Disorders, Research Version, Non-patient Edition. (SCID-I/NP) New York: Biometrics Research, New York State Psychiatric Institute, November 2002.
  5. ^ First, Michael B., Williams, Janet B.W., Spitzer, Robert L., and Gibbon, Miriam: Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Axis I Disorders, Clinical Trials Version (SCID-CT). New York: Biometrics Research, New York State Psychiatric Institute, 2007.
  6. ^ First, Michael B., Spitzer, Robert L, Gibbon Miriam, and Williams, Janet B.W.: Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders, Clinician Version (SCID-CV). Washington, D.C.: American Psychiatric Press, Inc., 1996.
  7. ^ First, MB., Gibbon M, Spitzer RL, Williams, JBW, Benjamin LS.: Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II Personality Disorders, (SCID-II). Washington, D.C.: American Psychiatric Press, Inc., 1997.
  8. ^ Spitzer, Robert L, Williams Janet BW, Gibbon Miriam, First Michael B, Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R, Patient Edition/Non-patient Edition,(SCID-P/SCID-NP), Washington, D.C.: American Psychiatric Press, Inc., 1990.
  9. ^ Spitzer, Robert L, Williams Janet BW, Gibbon Miriam, First Michael B, Structured Clinican Interview for DSM-III-R Axis II Disorders,(SCID-II), Washington, D.C.: American Psychiatric Press, Inc., 1990
  10. ^ Steinberg M: Interviewers Guide to the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders (SCID-D). Washington, DC, American Psychiatric Press, 1994.
  11. ^ Boon S, Draijer N (1991). "Diagnosing dissociative disorders in The Netherlands: a pilot study with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R Dissociative Disorders". The American Journal of Psychiatry 148 (4): 458–62.  

External links

  • scid4.org: official site
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.