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Chief Minister (India)

 

Chief Minister (India)

In the Republic of India, a Chief Minister is the elected head of government of each of twenty-nine states and two union territories (Delhi and Puducherry). According to the Constitution of India, the Governor is a state's de jure head, but de facto executive authority rests with the Chief Minister. Following elections to the state legislative assembly, the Governor usually invites the party (or coalition) with a majority of seats to form the government. The Governor appoints and swears in the Chief Minister, whose council of ministers are collectively responsible to the assembly. Based on the Westminster system, given that he retains the confidence of the assembly, the Chief Minister's term can last for the length of the assembly's life—a maximum of five years. There are no limits to the number of terms that the Chief Minister can serve.[1]

Contents

  • Selection process 1
    • Eligibility 1.1
    • Election 1.2
    • Oath 1.3
  • Remuneration 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4

Selection process

Eligibility

The Constitution of India sets the principle qualifications one must meet to be eligible to the office of the Chief Minister. A Chief Minister must be:

  • a citizen of India.
  • should be a member of the state legislature. If a person is elected chief minister who is not a member of the legislature, then he/she must take sign from governor.
  • of 25 years of age or more[2]

Election

The chief minister is elected through a majority in the state legislative assembly. This is procedurally established by the vote of confidence in the legislative assembly, as suggested by the governor of the state who is the appointing authority.

Oath

Since, according to the constitution, the chief minister is appointed by the governor, the swearing in is done before the governor of the state.

The oath of office.

The oath of secrecy

Remuneration

By Article 164 of the constitution of India, remuneration of the chief minister as well as other ministers are to be decided by the respective state legislatures.[3] Hence this varies from state to state.

See also

References

  1. ^ Durga Das Basu. Introduction to the Constitution of India. 1960. 20th Edition, 2011 Reprint. pp. 241, 245. LexisNexis Butterworths Wadhwa Nagpur. ISBN 978-81-8038-559-9.
  2. ^ Constitution of India, Article 173
  3. ^ The Constitution of India, Article 164, Clause 5
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