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Gaianism

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Title: Gaianism  
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Subject: Gaia philosophy, New Age, New religious movements, Terraforming in popular culture, Hekatonkheires
Collection: New Age, New Religious Movements
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Gaianism

Gaianism (also referred to as Gaian Religion, with an offshoot termed "New Age Gaian") is an earth-centered philosophical, [1] Gaianism has been associated with the New Age movement due to sharing similar viewpoints, but is not typically identified as strictly part of the New Age movement as a whole.

Contents

  • Belief structure 1
  • Practitioners 2
  • See Also 3
  • References 4

Belief structure

Followers of Gaianism state that the term is based both in the felt connection and scientific understanding of the biosphere, which is given the name

  1. ^ a b  
  2. ^ Richard Peet, Nigel Thrift (1989). New Models in Geography - Vol 1: The Political-Economy Perspective. Routledge. pp. 90, 97–99.  
  3. ^ Robinson, Mike (1992). The Greening of British Party Politics. Manchester University Press. pp. 54–56.  

References

See Also

Practitioners of Gaianism are termed "Gaians", or sometimes Gaianists. Followers typically approach the philosophy with the perspective that you should honor the earth, reduce or soften the human impact on the earth, and to be respectful of all life on earth. The latter perspective is extended to all forms of life such as plant, animal, or human, and followers will often try to maintain a close relationship with the planet in order to strive toward world peace, maintain global homeostasis and find inner fulfillment. Gaians will occasionally follow Gaianism along with other religions, but for many Gaianism is not necessarily religious.

Practitioners

Gaia can be understood as a super-organism made of organisms, as multi-cellular life can be understood as a super-organism at a smaller level of scale. [3]

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