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Around the World in 80 Days

By: Jules Verne

...everages were refreshingly cooled with ice, brought at great cost from the American lakes. If to live in this style is to be eccentric, it must be con... ... Fogg was seated, and James Forster, the dismissed servant, appeared. “The new servant,” said he. A young man of thirty advanced and bowed. “Y ou are ... ...f without a word. Passepartout heard the street door shut once; it was his new master going out. He heard it shut again; it was his 7 Jules Verne pre... ...enly ceased. Yet the good ship ploughed straight on, unretarded by wind or wave, towards the straits of Bab-el-Mandeb. What was Phileas Fogg doing all... ...g, clove, and pepper plantations, while the steam curled in spirals around groups of palm-trees, in the midst of which 42 Around the World in 80 Days... ...s of the glade, which was lit up by the torches. The ground was covered by groups of the Indians, motionless in their drunken sleep; it seemed a battl... ... rolled heavily and the passengers became impatient of the long, monstrous waves which the wind raised before their path. A sort of tem- pest arose on... ... port he found a confused mass of ships of all nations: En- glish, French, American, and Dutch, men-of-war and trad- ing vessels, Japanese and Chinese... ...ossed bamboo ladders, dispersed into all the corners, and produced strange musical effects by the combination of their various pitches of tone. The ju...

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Autobiographic Sketches Selections, Grave and Gay

By: Thomas de Quincey

...iversity. Contents EXTRACT FROM A LETTER WRITTEN BY MR. DE QUINCEY TO THE AMERICAN EDITOR OF THIS WORKS. ............................................... ...r of mine, that paper I should wish to cancel. So that, upon the whole, my new and revised edition is likely to differ by very consid- erable changes ... ...at quadrata rotundis,) it is my purpose to enlarge this edition by as many new papers as I find available for such a station. These I am anxious to pu... ...secondly, in having made me a participator in the pecuniary profits of the American edition, without solicita- tion or the shadow of any expectation o... ...ies, his heart may have been corrupted, and that even now his faith may be wavering or impure. We will try. Make the sign of the cross, and observe wh... ...an away,—a slight jar was thus given to the else triumphal effect of these musical ovations. Once having ut- tered my protest, however, willingly I ga... ... when the one side yearned for breakfast, and the other for a respite: the groups, therefore, on or about the bridge, if any at all, were loose in the... ...was a family of amiable children, who were more skilfully trained in their musical studies than at that day was usual. They sang the old English glees... ...r deliverance, she would have caught at it; and probably would again, from wavering of mind, have dallied with the danger. Perhaps at this point, havi...

...Contents EXTRACT FROM A LETTER WRITTEN BY MR. DE QUINCEY TO THE AMERICAN EDITOR OF THIS WORKS. ...................................................................................................... 4 PREFACE TO THE ENGLISH EDITION .............................................................

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The Complete Poetical Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley

By: Thomas Hutchinson

...eedom as the direct agent to effect the happiness of mankind; and thus any new-sprung hope of liberty inspired a joy and an exultation more intense an... ...rt the operation of his arduous struggles. His spirit gathers peace in its new state from the sense that, though late, his exer- tions were not made i... ...is”, and “Hellas”. In the wild but beautiful Bay of Spezzia, the winds and waves which he loved became his playmates. His days were chiefly spent on t... ...e the vital morn, _5 When throned on ocean’s wave It breathes over the world: Yet both so passing strange and wonderful!... ...The ghastly torrent mingles its far roar, With the breeze murmuring in the musical woods. Where the embowering trees recede, and leave A little space ... ... the beautiful shade Of the green groves, with all their odorous winds And musical motions. Calm, he still pursued The stream, that with a larger volu... ...sible ravages of tyranny and war, cities and villages reduced to scattered groups of black and roofless houses, and the naked inhabitants sitting fami... ... the revolution eight hundred students, and among them several Germans and Americans. The munificence and energy of many of the Greek princes and merc... ... reported that this Messiah had arrived at a seaport near Lacedaemon in an American brig. The association of names and ideas is irresistibly ludicrous...

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One of Our Conquerors

By: George Meredith

... ‘There you’re wrong; nor wouldn’t be.’ ‘What’s that?’ was the gentleman’s musical inquiry. ‘That’s flat, as you was half a minute ago,’ the man re- j... ... the infinitely little while threading his way to a haberdasher’s shop for new white waistcoats. Under the shadow of the rep- resentative statue of Ci... ...,’ exclaimed Mr. Radnor. ‘He informed me that Mrs. Burman has heard of the new mansion.’ ‘My place at Lakelands?’ Mr. Radnor’s clear-water eyes harden... ...n the voluptuous indolence of a man drawn along by Nereids over sunny sea- waves to behold the birth of the Foam-Goddess? ‘ According to Carling, her ... ...most, or most commercially, succoured and fattened by our rule there: they wave adieu to the conquering Islanders, as to ‘Parsees beneath a cloud.’ Th... ...as to meet the friends with whom her feelings were at home, among whom her musical gifts gave her station: they liked her for herself; they helped her... ... He thanked heaven to his wife often, that he had nothing to do with North American or South American mines and pastures or with South Africa and, gol... ...and in- structed Germans not deviously march; whom acute and ad- venturous Americans, with half a cock of the eye in passing, compassionately outstrip... ...g may have helped; he had it from Fenellan; and he was among the principal groups, claiming or making acquaintances, as a lawyer should do. The Concer...

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The Reef

By: Edith Wharton

...nd the angry sea beyond, they leapt out at him as if from the crest of the waves, stung and blinded him with a fresh fury of derision. “Unexpected obs... ...h other again, in London, some three months previously, at a dinner at the American Embassy, and when she had caught sight of him her smile had been l... ...ou know Mrs. Leath? That’s perfect, for General Farnham has failed me”—had waved them together for the march to the diningroom, Darrow had felt a slig... .... Her husband had struck him as a characteristic speci- men of the kind of American as to whom one is not quite clear whether he lives in Europe in or... ...cy) a deeper feeling of communion, and their days there had been like some musical prelude, where the instruments, breathing low, seem to hold back th... ... be walking to him down the years, the light and shade of old memories and new hopes playing vari- ously on her, and each step giving him the vision o... ...of a stout-shod sole, she had answered cheerfully: “No—luckily I had on my new boots,” he began to feel that human intercourse would still be tolerabl... ...n evolved, if not designed, to that end, he had instinctively kept the two groups apart in his mind, avoiding that intermediate society which attempts... ...almost certainly” an anarchist. It was this nucleus, and its outer ring of musical, architectural and other American students, which posed successivel...

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Moby-Dick or the Whale

By: Herman Melville

...a most monstrous size. * * This came towards us, open mouthed, raising the waves on all sides, and beating the sea before him into a foam.” Tooke’s Lu... ...ner Had never seen; from dread Leviathan To insect millions peopling every wave: Gather’d in shoals immense, like floating islands, Led by mysterious i... ... the Pacific Ocean. ” By Owen Chase of Nantucket, first mate of said vessel. New York. 1821. “A mariner sat on the shrouds one night, The wind was pipin... ...pen the haunts of the whale, the whalemen seem to have indirectly hit upon new clews to that same mystic North West Passage.” From “Something” unpubli... ...ock. “It is generally well known that out of the crews of Whaling vessels (American) few ever return in the ships on board of which they departed.” Cr... ...water there be in all that region. Should you ever be athirst in the great American desert, try this experiment, if your caravan happen to be supplied... ... enter into the inquiry as to the true method of dividing the cetacea into groups and families. Utter confusion exists among the historians of this an... ...ing and weaving away when I started at a sound so strange, long drawn, and musically wild and unearthly, that the ball of free will dropped from my ha... ...Here we go again. This wooden mallet is the cork, and I’m the professor of musical glasses — tap, tap!” (Ahab to himself.) “There’s a sight! There’s a...

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Moby Dick; Or the Whale

By: Herman Melville

...most mon- strous size. ... This came towards us, open-mouthed, raising the waves on all sides, and beating the sea before him into a foam.” —Tooke’ s ... ...ner Had never seen; from dread Leviathan To insect millions peopling every wave: Gather’d in shoals immense, like floating islands, Led by mysterious ... ...the pacific ocean.” By Owen Chace of Nantucket, First Mate of said vessel. New York, 1821. “A mariner sat in the shrouds one night, The wind was pip- ... ... of the whale, 12 Moby Dick the whalemen seem to have indirectly hit upon new clews to that same mystic North-West Passage.” —From “Some- thing” unpu... ...ack. “It is generally well known that out of the crews of Whaling vessels (American) few ever return in the ships on board of which they departed.” —C... ...water there be in all that region. Should you ever be athirst in the great American desert, try this experiment, if your caravan happen to be supplied... ... enter into the inquiry as to the true method of dividing the cetacea into groups and families.... Utter confusion exists among the historians of this... ...ING and weaving away when I started at a sound so strange, long drawn, and musically wild and unearthly, that the ball of free will dropped from my ha... ...Here we go again. This wooden mallet is the cork, and I’m the professor of musical glasses—tap, tap!” (Ahab to himself.) “There’s a sight! There’s a s...

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The French Revolution a History Volume Two

By: Thomas Carlyle

..................................................... 145 Chapter 2.4.V . The New Berline. ................................................................. ... bish can and must be, is swept aside; and so again, on clear arena, under new conditions, with something even of a new stateliness, we begin a new co... ...y and by Anaxagoras Chaumette, one already descries: mellifluous in street-groups; not now a sea-boy on the high and giddy mast: a mellifluous tribune... ... sea cockfight it is, and of the hottest; where British Serapis and French-American Bon Homme Richard do lash and throttle each other, in their fashio... ...s doing what it can; and has enough to do: it must, as ever, with one hand wave persuasively, repressing Patriotism; and keep the other clenched to me... ...e glad people, with moisture and fire in their eyes, ‘spontaneously formed groups, and swore one another, ’ (Newspapers (in Hist. Parl. iv. 445.)—and ... ...s of Federates, of this Fed- eration, will have enough to do! Harangue of ‘American Committee, ’ among whom is that faint figure of Paul Jones ‘as wit... ... his old eyes, on that new wonder- scene; dreamlike to him, and uncertain, wavering amid fragments of old memories and dreams. For Time is all grow- i... ...rim melody and rhythm; into his Hymn or March of the Marseillese: luckiest musical-composition ever promulgated. The sound of which will make the bloo...

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The Lady of the Lake

By: William J. Rolfe

...first edition, the “ Globe “ edition, and about a dozen others English and American. I found many misprints and corrup- tions in all except the editio... ... toil, By far Lochard or Aberfoyle. But nearer was the copsewood gray That waved and wept on Loch Achray, And mingled with the pine-trees blue On the ... ...o strange the road, So wondrous were the scenes it showed. XI. The western waves of ebbing day Rolled o’er the glen their level way; Each purple peak,... ...Lake CANTO FOURTH. The Prophecy. I. The rose is fairest when ‘t is budding new, And hope is brightest when it dawns from fears; The rose is sweetest... ...s the Franciscan steeple reel? And see! upon the crowded street, In motley groups what masquers meet! Banner and pageant, pipe and drum, And merry mor... ...w (cf. vi. 488), and sometimes = precipice. 73. On the lone wood. Note the musical variation in the measure here; the 1st, 3d, and 4th syllables being... ...ir daughter, you do draw my spirits from me 132 The Lady of the Lake With new lamenting ancient oversights!” 305. Some mossy bank, etc. The MS. reads... ...5 below. 523. In better time. That is, in better times or days; not in the musical sense. 524. Chime. Accord, sing; a poetical use of the word. Cf. vi...

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In the South Seas

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

...ds the close of ’89. By that time gratitude and habit were beginning to attach me to the is- lands; I had gained a competency of strength; I had made ... ... By 8 In The South Seas the same step I had journeyed forth out of that comfort- able zone of kindred languages, where the curse of Babel is so easy ... ...there dwelt an old, melancholy, grizzled man of the name of Tari (Charlie) Coffin. He was a native of Oahu, in the Sandwich Islands; and had gone to s... ...ey of Hapaa, known to readers of Herman Melville under the grotesque misspell- ing of Hapar. There are but two writers who have touched the South Seas... ...ir plantations. How plausible! And yet the Marquesans are dying out in the same houses where their fathers multi- plied. Or take opium. The Marquesas ... ...Nuka-hiva, facing the north-east, and Taahauku in Hiva- oa, some hundred miles to the southward, and facing the south-west. Both these were on the sam... ...uproarious breakers of the oppo- site beach. The sense of insecurity in such a thread of resi- 111 Robert Louis Stevenson dence is more than fanciful... ...ucted, or seem- ing so by contrast. There was much variety of measure, and towards the end of each piece, when the fun became fast and furious, a reco... ... fled; and when at length the leader found the wit or the author- ity to get his troop in motion and revive the singing, it was with much diminished f...

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Notes on a Journey from Cornhill to Grand Cairo

By: William Makepeace Thackeray

...such a store of pleasant recollections for after days— and creates so many new sources of interest (a newspaper letter from Beyrout, or Malta, or Algi... ...s of red, were standing on the sand close by the tumbling, shining, purple waves:and there we beheld, for the first time, the Royal red and yellow sta... ...agero-o!” 11 Thackeray We all went down to tea rather melancholy; but the new milk, in the place of that abominable whipped egg, revived us again; an... ...wing and reading, and the blind were, for the most part, set to perform on musical instruments, and got up a con- cert for the visitors. It was then w... ...ible, that even as blind beggars they could hardly get a livelihood in the musical way. 15 Thackeray HENCE WE WERE DRIVEN to the huge palace of Neces... ...bbers!” we said; “the clumsy humbugs! there’s none but Britons to rule the waves!” and we gave our- selves piratical airs, and went down presently and... ...ion and liveliness as I have never witnessed before. And the effect of the groups of multitudinous actors in this busy cheerful drama is heightened, a... ...e moored everywhere, showing their flags, Rus- sian and English, Austrian, American, and Greek; and along the quays country ships from the Black Sea o... ...issaries, with silver maces shining in the sun. ’Twas the party of the new American Consul-General of Syria and Jerusalem, hastening to that city, wit...

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A Modern Utopia

By: H. G. Wells

...s together; we should make the whole race wise, tolerant, noble, per- fect—wave our hands to a splendid anarchy, every man do- ing as it pleases him, ... ...at, indeed, is the cardinal assumption of all Utopian speculations old and new; the Republic and Laws of Plato, and More’s Utopia, Howells’ implicit A... ... force; the Republic of Plato stood armed ready for defensive war, and the New Atlantis and the Uto- pia of More in theory, like China and Japan throu... ..., and at the word terminology I should insinuate a comment on that eminent American bi- ologist, Professor Mark Baldwin, who has carried the language ... ...ing the obverse side, and a head thereon—of Newton, as I live! One detects American influ- ence here. Each year, as we shall find, each denomination o... ... and of the methods of intercourse and collective decision that hold human groups together, and finally of government and the State. The eluci- dation... ... the exploitation of coal and electric power, and the pow- ers of wind and wave and water will be within its right. It will pour out this energy by as... ... be a great multitude of gracious little houses clustering in college-like groups, no doubt about their com- mon kitchens and halls, down and about th... ... chance light on the labour prob- lem—by perforating records for automatic musical ma- chines—no doubt of the Pianotist and Pianola kind—and he spent ...

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Adventures in the South Seas

By: Herman Melville

...d the stem of his sooty pipe against the sleeve of his frock, and politely waved it toward me. The attention was sailor-like; as for the nicety of the... ...hundred tons, Yankee-built and very old. Fit- ted for a privateer out of a New England port during the war of 1812, she had been captured at sea by a ... ... or blow low, she was always ready for the breeze; and when she dashed the waves from her prow, and pranced, and pawed the sea, you never thought of h... ...haleboats were gone: and of the four harpooners, only one was left, a wild New Zealander, or “Mowree” as his countrymen are more com- monly called in ... ...g to the commander of the corvette, had recently gone ashore there from an American whaler, and were desirous of ship- ping aboard one of their own co... ...arcely any price too dear which will purchase his darling “tot.” Nowadays, American whalemen in the Pacific never think of carrying spirits as a ratio... ... classic. Its natu- ral features alone distinguish it from the surrounding groups. Two round and lofty promontories, whose mountains rise nine thousan... ...nd perpetually vio- lated laws against licentiousness of all kinds in both groups of islands. It is hardly to be expected that the missionaries would ... ...r Imeeo. It was a pleasant trip. The moon was up—the air, warm— the waves, musical—and all above was the tropical night, one purple vault hung round w...

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Diana of the Crossways

By: George Meredith

...is more, the beautiful creature can talk.’ He wondered, for she was young, new to society. Subsequently he is rather ashamed of his wonderment, and ac... ...he strings of sensualism,’ to the delight of a world gaping for marvels of musical execution rather than for music. For our world is all but a sensati... ... on the spin when he said, ‘Who is she?’ Sir Lukin did not know. ‘She ‘s a new bird; she nodded to my wife; I’ll ask.’ He manoeuvred a few steps cleve... ...as in the first conception of the edifice, backs were damp, boots liquidly musical, the pipe of consolation smoked with difficulty, with much pulling ... ...r happiness at the kiss of parting. That melancholy note at the top of the wave to human hearts conscious of its en- forced decline was repeated by th... ...appetites. The old dog-world took signal from it. The one-legged devil-god waved his wooden hoof, and the creatures in view, the hunt was uproarious. ... ...e worked for my bread. I had thoughts of America. I fancy I can write; and Americans, one hears, are gentle to women.’ ‘Ah, Tony! there’s the looking ... ...y Diana, little though she concentered her attention on any figures of the groups. She had the woman’s 120 Diana of the Crossways faculty (transientl... ... inducement she had received to embark her money in this Company: a South- American mine, collapsed almost within hearing of the trum- pets of prospec...

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The French Revolution a History Volume Three

By: Thomas Carlyle

...for it, becomes transcendental; and must now seek its wild way through the New, Chaotic,—where Force is not yet distinguished into Bidden and Forbidde... ... hand, on this waste aspect of a France all stirring and whirling, in ways new, untried, had been able to discern where the cardinal movement lay; whi... ...ings;” and fast as powder under spark, we all blaze up once more, and with waved hats shout and swear: “Yes, nous le jurons; plus de roi!” (Ibid. xvii... ... Blue, and cut her loose: but whether now is it she, with her softness and musical speech, or is it he, with his hardness and sharp falchion and aegis... ...vidual Patriot, flame monitory on all walls. Flags of Danger to Fatherland wave at the Hotel-de-Ville; on the Pont Neuf—over the prostrate Statues of ... ...uses broken into (by a tumult of Patri- ots, among whom red-capped Varlet, American Fournier loom forth, in the darkness of the rain and riot); had th... ...ese Girondins; at every hit the glad Mountain utters chorus: Marat, like a musical bis, repeating the last phrase. (Seance du 1er Avril, 1793 (in Hist... ...ll end.”—Rumour may spread over Paris: the Convention clusters itself into groups; wide- eyed, whispering, “Danton arrested!” Who then is safe? Legend... ...ld also instead of the old grim Tappe-durs of Robespierre, what new street-groups are these? Young men habited not in black-shag Carmagnole spencer, b...

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The Octopus a Story of California

By: Frank Norris

...e-mend,” Hooven burst out, sud- denly remembering a forgotten argument. He waved an arm. “Ach, der pipe-line bei der Mission Greek, und der waater-hol... ... his poem should be of the West, that world’s frontier of Romance, where a new race, a new people—hardy, brave, and passionate—were building an empire... ... father’s letter. “He holds, Ulsteen does, that ‘grain rates as low as the new figure would amount to confiscation of property, and that, on such a ba... ...nt in Vanamee’s monotonous under- tones, like little notes of harmony in a musical progres- sion, he listened, delighted with their resonance. -Navajo... ...d,” she insisted. “We can talk about other things afterward.” Again Magnus wavered, about to yield to his better in- stincts and to the entreaties of ... ...ffices to an empty church—’the voice of one crying in the wilderness.’ You Americans are not good churchmen. Sundays you sleep— you read the newspaper... ...cists, repeated from page to page with wearying insistence. “I, too, am an American Citizen. S. D.,” “As the T wig is Bent the T ree is Inclined,” “Tr... ... petticoats. On the row of chairs that went around three sides of the wall groups began to settle themselves. For a long time the guests huddled close... ...Klondike; now a decayed musician who had been ejected from a young ladies’ musical conservatory of Europe be- cause of certain surprising pamphlets on...

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The Wings of the Dove

By: Henry James

...stranger opportunities, confronted with rare questions and called upon for new discriminations. Thus the scheme of her situation would, in a comprehen... ...wer—blooming alone, for the fullest attestation of her freedom—of an “old” New York stem; the happy congrui- ties thus preserved for her being matters... ...erned with. I had from far back mentally projected a certain sort of young American as more the “heir of all the ages” than any other young person wha... ...eir house had the effect of some fine florid voluminous phrase, say even a musical, that dropped first into words and notes without sense and then, ha... ...panish dancer, understood to be at that moment the delight of the town, an American reciter, the joy of a kindred people, an Hungarian fiddler, the wo... ...as she was apt to call her companion for a lighter change, had only had to wave a neat little wand for the fairy-tale to begin at once; in consequence... ...ghted, came back, taking up her destiny again as if she had been able by a wave or two of her wings to place herself briefly in sight of an alternativ... ...ey even went so far as to impose themselves as 225 Henry James one of the groups of social phenomena that fell into the scheme of his public letters.... ...it would 273 Henry James doubtless have been hard to say which of the two groups now played most of a part. He was kept face to face with this young ...

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When the Sleeper Wakes

By: H. G. Wells

...e tried. Unwisely perhaps. I have fol- lowed the coast, day after day—from New Quay. It has only added muscular fatigue to the mental. The cause of th... .... If in no other way—at the foot of yonder dark precipice there, where the waves are green, and the white surge lifts and falls, and that little threa... ... raised a family, my eldest lad—I hadn’t begun to think of sons then—is an American citizen, and looking for- ward to leaving Harvard. There’s a touch... ...o retreating men and fell again, and immediately Graham was alone with the new comer and the purple-robed man with the flaxen beard. For a space the t... ...is wonderful popularity, he bowed, and, seeking a gesture of longer range, waved his arm. He was astonished at the violence of uproar that this provok... ...fter two hundred years. The haphazard cylinders he substituted displayed a musical fan- tasia. At first it was beautiful, and then it was sensuous. He... ...a crowd. He stopped near the highest step. Before him, on that level, were groups of seats and a little kiosk. He went up to this and, stopping in the... ...ty at the very beginning.” “What was his name?” “Graham.” “No, I mean—that American’s.” “Isbister.” “Isbister!” cried Graham. “Why, I don’t even know ... ...ble gold. They clambered up the tottering walls, they clung in wreaths and groups about the high-standing pillars. They swarmed along the edges of the...

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The Voyage Out

By: Virginia Woolf

...harply again and again. “We’re off,” said Ridley. A slight but perceptible wave seemed to roll beneath 10 The Voyage Out the floor; then it sank; the... ...olume of Pindar when Willoughby was launching his first ship. They built a new factory the very year the commentary on Aristotle—was it?—appeared at t... ...m ran through them all. The ship was making her way steadily through small waves which slapped her and then fizzled like ef- fervescing water, leaving... ... way of any real talent that the pupil might chance to have. Rachel, being musical, was allowed to learn nothing but music; she became a fanatic about... ...They had dropped anchor in the mouth of the Tagus, and instead of cleaving new waves perpetu- ally, the same waves kept returning and washing against ... ...it would be to join the ranks of the married women—no longer to hang on to groups of girls much younger than herself—to escape the long solitude of an... ...“which shall it be?” “Balzac,” said Rachel, “or have you the Speech on the American Revolution, Uncle Ridley?” “The Speech on the American Revolution?... ...w figures in the thin white dust to explain how Bach wrote his fugues. “My musical gift was ruined,” he explained, as they walked on after one of thes... ... she darted and ejaculated he gave Rachel a sketch of the history of South American art. He would deal with one of his wife’s exclamations, and then r...

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Nostromo a Tale of the Seaboard

By: Joseph Conrad

...ume picked up outside a second-hand book-shop. It was the life story of an American sea- man written by himself with the assistance of a jour- nalist.... ...ilence to anarchist speeches at the meeting, the enigmatical patron of the new revolu- tionary agitation, the trusted, the wealthy comrade Fidanza wit... ...os—the “beautiful Antonia.” Whether she is a possible varia- tion of Latin-American girlhood I wouldn’t dare to affirm. But, for me, she is. Always a ... ...nrad Aristocrat and Nostromo the Man of the People are the artisans of the New Era, the true creators of the New State; he by his legendary and daring... ...into the wall above marble consoles, square spaces of carpet under the two groups of arm- chairs, each presided over by a deep sofa; smaller rugs scat... ...y considerable in the eyes of a vain populace) waited with alacrity upon a wave of his hand. And rather more than a year later, during his unexpected ... ...and the great herds fed with all their horned heads one way, in one single waver- ing line as far as eye could reach across the broad potreros. A spre... ...hecking the mare almost to a standstill now and then for children, for the groups of people from the distant Campo, who stared after him with admirati... ...ased the earthenware filter in the corner of the kitchen kept on its swift musical drip, drip into the great porous jar below. Towards sunset he got u...

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