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American New Wave Musical Groups (X)

       
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Babbitt

By: Sinclair Lewis

...sting them from the business center, and on the farther hills were shining new houses, homes—they seemed—for laughter and tranquillity. Over a concret... ...elow the bridge curved a railroad, a maze of green and crimson lights. The New York Flyer boomed past, and twenty lines of polished steel leaped into ... ...us cursing, virile flannel shirts. He creaked to his feet, groaning at the waves of pain which passed behind his eyeballs. Though he waited for their ... ...elieved to be cynical) were candidly eager. But he was not over-gentle. He waved his hand at poor dumpy Verona and drawled: “Yes, I guess we’re pretty... ...lin Avenue & 3d St., N.E Zenith Omar Gribble, Esq., 376 North American Building, Zenith. Dear Mr. Gribble: Your letter of the twentieth t... ...ompson, the old-fashioned, lean Yankee, rugged, traditional, stage type of American business man, and Babbitt, the plump, smooth, efficient, up-to-the... ...y.” The real convention consisted of men muttering in hotel bedrooms or in groups amid the badge-spotted crowd in the hotel-lobby, but there was a sho... ...were bringing folding chairs up from the basement. There was an impressive musical program, conducted by Sheldon Smeeth, educational di- rector of the... ...ck around with me, old man, and I’ll show you a good time!” They went to a musical comedy and nudged each other 212 Babbitt at the matrimonial jokes ...

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The Soul of a Bishop

By: H. G. Wells

...nd weak, and left him a prey to strange disturbances, rather than that any new process of thought was eating into his mind. These doubts in his mind w... .... The fine old abbey church of Princhester, which was the cathedral of the new diocese, looked when first he saw it like a lady Abbess who had taken t... ...el- oping when King George was being crowned. Close upon that event came a wave of social discontent, the great railway strike, a curious sense of soc... ...s eat the fruit in Paradise? Perhaps there they worked for some collective musical effect, had some sort of conductor in the place of this—hullabaloo…... ... reply. What was there for a bishop to object to? There was that admirable American widow, Lady Sunderbund. She was enor- mously rich, she was enthusi... ...aised eye- brows. “I was thinking of Bent. But anyhow there’s been a great wave of seriousness, a sudden turning to religion and reli- gious things. I... ...wnham with her next September. She aspired to his- tory. Miriam’s bent was musical. She and Phoebe and Daphne and Clementina were under the care of sk... ...The English were indolent, the French decadent, the Russians barbaric, the Americans basely democratic; the rest of the world was the “White man’s Bur... ...of shining wet sand, a multitude of gulls was mysteriously busy. These two groups of activities and Eleanor’s flitting translucent movements did but s...

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Of Human Bondage

By: Somerset Maugham

...sked. “ Y es, I’ve come to fetch you.” 6 Of Human Bondage “ Y ou’ve got a new dress on.” It was in eighteen-eighty-five, and she wore a bustle. Her g... ...s sister; and while the ladies talked of parish matters, the curate or the new bonnet of Mrs. Wilson—Mr. Wilson was the richest man in Blackstable, he... ... Some of them had already started and those that were left now set off, in groups of two or three. “You’d better come along with me, Carey,” said the ... ...he Misses Watkin so that they might see his grief and pity him. XIV THEN A WAVE of religiosity passed through the school. Bad language was no longer h... ... , and his almond eyes almost closed as he did so. There were two or three American men, in black coats, rather yellow and dry of skin: they were theo... ... twelve months. But then I shall have to go. And I must leave all this”—he waved his arm round the dirty garret, with its unmade bed, the clothes lyin... ... tall and slim. He held himself with a deliberate grace. Weeks, one of the American students, seeing him alone, went up and began to talk to him. The ... ... the real thing: I felt the glow of your young passion, and your prose was musical from the sincerity of your emotion. You must be happy! I wish I cou... ...id style which seemed able to put com- plicated thought into simple words, musical and measured, he read as he might have read a novel, a smile of ple...

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Life of John Coleridge Patteson : Missionary Bishop of the Melanesian Islands

By: Charlotte Mary Yonge

... year that the Rev. George Augustus Selwyn was appointed to the diocese of New Zealand. Mrs. Selwyn’s parents had always been inti- mate with the Patt... ...and since Bishop of Oxford and of Win- chester, preached in the morning at New Windsor parish church, and the newly-made Bishop of New Zealand in the ... ...anner of saying the prayers was exceedingly good: his voice very sweet and musical; without seeming loud, it was fully audible, and gave assurance of ... ...which had been taken in hand by a Scot- tish Presbyterian Mission; but the groups which seem to form 100 Life of John Coleridge Patteson the third fr... ...expeditions; but of late whalers and sandal wood traders, both English and American, had been finding their way among them, and too often acting as ir... ... twenty feet high in the trunk, for trunk it is, and the great broad frond waves over it in a way that would make that child Pena 115 Yo n g e clap h... ...ses, and star-light nights, and the great many-voiced ocean, the winds and waves chiming all night with a solemn sound, lapping against my ear as I li... ...in those private classes that he exercised such wonderful in- fluence; his musical voice, his holy face, his gentle manner, all helping doubtless to i... ...e the chief obstacle to the Mission. After describing an interview with an American captain, he continues:—’Reports are rife of a semi-legalised slave...

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What Is Man and Other Essays of Mark Twain

By: Mark Twain

...d, “I am told that you are a coward!” It was not he that turned over the new leaf—she did it for him. He must not strut around in the merit of it—i... ...es of outside influences—we originate nothing within. Whenever we take a new line of thought and drift into a new line of belief and action, the imp... ... and preaches Christ and Him crucified every day and every night to little groups of half civilized foreign paupers who scoff at him. But he rejoices ... ... father. He had a young sister with a remarkable voice—he was giving her a musical education, so that her longing to be self supporting might be grat... ...rotestant; Ameri can—ditto; Spaniard, Frenchman, Irishman, Italian, South American—Roman Catholic; Russian—Greek Catholic; T urk—Mohammedan; and so o... ...ns, the Russians, the Germans, the French, the English, the Spaniards, the Americans, the South Americans, the Japanese, the Chinese, the Hindus, the ... ..., and had secured lodg ings and opera seats months in advance. I am not a musical critic, and did not come here to write essays about the operas and ... ... their profoundest depths; that there are times when they want to rise and wave handker chiefs and shout their approbation, and times when tears are ... ...adow of it could never be fairly reflected in picture or poem. Through the wavering snowfall, the Saint Theodore upon one of the granite pillars of th...

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The Pit a Story of Chicago

By: Frank Norris

...ity university. 3 Frank Norris The Pit A Story of Chicago By FRANK NORRIS NEW YO NEW YO NEW YO NEW YO NEW YORK RK RK RK RK 1903 1903 1903 1903 1903 D... ...tion to (I) the production, (2) the distribution, (3) the consump- tion of American wheat. When complete, they will form the story of a crop of wheat ... ... in the preparation of the following novel are due to Mr. G. D. Moulson of New York, Whose unwearied patience and untiring kindness helped him to the ... ... wear them after all. My poor little flowers.” But she showed him a single American Beauty, pinned to the shoulder of her gown beneath her cape. “Yes,... ...ad been falling since early evening had changed to a lugubrious drizzle. A wave of consterna- tion invaded the vestibule for those who had not come in... ...lmost as crowded as though at noontime. Messenger boys ran to and fro, and groups of men stood on the corners in earnest conversation. The whole neigh... ...th you, and be helping you, and all that sort of thing. Now, all this,” he waved a hand at the confusion of furniture, “all this to-day—I just feel,” ... ...s full of yellow envelopes. From the telephone alcoves came the prolonged, musical rasp of the call bells. In the Western Union booths the keys of the... ...elodrama. She had a taste for the magnificent. She revelled in these great musical “effects” upon her organ, the grandiose eas- ily appealed to her, w...

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Bram Stoker's Dracula

By: Bram Stoker

...ong, to sweep the outside edge of a river clear. At every station there were groups of people, some Chapter 1 5 times crowds, and in all sorts of at... ...on to have neither eyes nor ears for the outer world. There were many things new to me. For in stance, hay ricks in the trees, and here and there ve... ... side of the great fireplace, leaning against the stonework, made a graceful wave of his hand to the table, and said, “I pray you, be seated and sup... ...lone as agent of my friend Peter Hawkins, of Exeter, to tell me all about my new estate in London. You shall, I trust, rest here with me a while, so t... ...apter 3 47 pered together, and then they all three laughed, such a silvery, musical laugh, but as hard as though the sound never could have come thro... ... Well, my dear, number Two came after lunch. He is such a nice fellow,and American from Texas, and he looks so young and so fresh that it seems alm... ...d has exquisite manners, but he found out that it amused me to hear him talk American slang,and whenever I was present, and there was no one to be sho... ...ossible to realize, the whole aspect of nature at once became convulsed. The waves rose in growing fury, each over topping its fellow, till in a very ... ...ut a lot of things, which he laid on the step, sorting them into four little groups, evidently one for each. Then he spoke. “My friends, we are goi...

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War and the Future; Italy, France and Britain at War

By: H. G. Wells

...rgely made up for by the good will and generous efforts of the English and American press. An interesting monograph might be written upon these variou... ...experience upon man- kind, as I hate some horrible infectious disease. The new war, the war on the modern level, is her invention and her crime. I per... ...was insistent upon the way in which all Venetia was being opened up by the new military roads; there has been scarcely a new road made in Venetia sinc... ...ut out a bed of begonias. In Paris I met a charming 50 War and the Future American writer, the wife of a French artist, the lady who wrote My House o... ...the dug-outs, they go forward with a minimum of inconve- nience. The first wave of attack fights, destroys, or disarms the surviving Germans and sends... ...of 500h.p. One gets up a gangway into them was one gets into a yacht; they wave a main deck, a forward machine gun deck and an aft machine gun; one ma... ...” at all. One finds that the apparent subaltern is really a musician, or a musical critic, or an Egyptologist, or a solicitor, or a cloth manufacturer... ...r their alli- ances, we may count it that the matter rests now between two groups of Allies and one neutral power. So that while on the one hand the d... .... 2 2 2 2 2 In the complex structure of the modern community there are two groups or strata or pockets in which the impulse of social obligation, the ...

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Reprinted Pieces

By: Charles Dickens

...roned, tomahawked, or eaten. Sitting on my ruddy hearth in the twilight of New Year’s Eve, I find incidents of travel rise around me from all the lati... ...ees the first uncertain glimmer of the light, ‘rising and falling with the waves, like a torch in the bark of some fisherman,’ which is the shining st... ...ike a torch in the bark of some fisherman,’ which is the shining star of a new world. Bruce is caged in Abyssinia, surrounded by the gory horrors whic... ... the mel ancholy assembly were seated on the deck, which was strewed with musical instruments, and the wreck of furniture and other articles. ‘Here a... ... off by the surge. He now supported himself by swimming, until a returning wave dashed him against the back part of the cavern. Here he laid hold of a... ... ashington Irv ing and Benjamin Franklin may have put it in my head by an American association of ideas; but there I was, and the Horse shoe Fall was... ...hed up that morning. On the beach, among the rough buggers and cap stans, groups of storm beaten boatmen, like a sort of marine monsters, watched und... ... sa! A sharp, smil ing youth, the wit of the kitchen, interposes. He an’t musical to night, sir. I’ve been giving him a moral lecture; I’ve been a ta... ...gateway in their uniforms, as if they had locked up all the balance (as my American friends would say) of the inhabitants, and could now rest a little...

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Roderick Hudson

By: Henry James

...ceived private proposals, and then present his treasures out of hand to an American city, not unknown to ; aesthetic fame, in which at that time there... ... Roderick Hudson air of apathetic homesickness, and she played her part in American society chiefly by having the little squares of brick pavement in ... ...owland spent his days at her side and felt before long as if he had made a new friend. All his impressions at this period were commented and interpret... ...well. It had the stamp of genius. Rowland envied the happy youth who, in a New England village, without aid or encourage- ment, without models or reso... ...nd myself—as if his merits were rather in the line of the”—and Mr. Striker waved his hand with a series of fantastic flourishes in the air—”of the lig... ...Striker; “Miss Garland perhaps most of all. Miss Garland,” and Mr. Striker waved his hand again as if to 40 Roderick Hudson perform an introduction w... ...r falls on castle walls And snowy summits old in story!” And with a great, musical roll of his voice he went swing- ing off into the darkness again, a... ...he grassy desolation of the Campagna. As the season went on and the social groups began to constitute themselves, he found that he knew a great many p... ...s therefore surprised at an incident which be- fell one evening at a large musical party. Roderick, as usual, was in the field, and, on the ladies tak...

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The Last of the Mohicans, A Narrative of 1757

By: James Fenimore Cooper

... to be characteristic. It is generally believed that the Aborigines of the American continent have an Asiatic origin. There are many physical as well ... ...ld do, being compelled to set bounds to fancy by experience; but the North American Indian clothes his ideas in a dress which is different from that o... ...ore Cooper whites. When it is remembered that the Dutch (who first settled New Y ork), the English, and the French, all gave appellations to the tribe... ...-civilized be- ings of the Oneidas, on the reservations of their people in New Y ork. The rest have disappeared, either from the regions in which thei... ...d. At a respectful distance from this unusual show, were gath- ered divers groups of curious idlers; some admiring the blood and bone of the high-mett... ...nce interrupting, and, for the time, closing 23 James Fenimore Cooper his musical efforts. “Though we are not in danger, common prudence would teach ... ...ow, guttural tones, which render his language, as spoken at times, so very musical; “then, Hawkeye, we were one people, and we were happy. The salt la... ...the shelter of the canoe, and, while it glided swiftly down the stream, he waved his hand, and gave forth the shout, which was the known signal of suc... ...h he felt the importance of their import. After a moment of hesitation, he waved his hand in assent, and uttered the English word “Good!” with the pec...

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Pictures from Italy

By: Charles Dickens

...ere Napoleon studied; and the noble river, bringing at every winding turn, new beauties into view. There lay before us, that same afternoon, the broke... ...s, hag like way with her forefinger, when approaching the remains of some new horror—looking back and walking stealthily, and making horrible grimace... ...ther figures, through a whole fever. Passing through the court yard, among groups of idle sol diers, we turned off by a gate, which this She Goblin u... ...ONS of such a place as Albaro, the suburb of Genoa, where I am now, as my American friends would say, ‘located,’ can hardly fail, I should imagine, t... ... from the heat of the fire, and where the brave Courier plays all sorts of musical instruments of his own manufacture, all the evening long. A mighty ... ...errara. But the long silent streets, and the dismantled palaces, where ivy waves in lieu of banners, and where rank weeds are slowly creeping up the l... ...y by the Jura mountains, sprinkled with snow, and lighted by the moon, and musical with falling water, was delightful; or how, below the windows of th... ...sed to view a little wooden doll, in face very like General Tom Thumb, the American Dwarf: gorgeously dressed in satin and gold lace, and actually bla... ...ion of great churches which come rolling past me like a sea, it is a small wave by itself, that melts into no other wave, and does not flow on with th...

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Sartor Resartus: The Life and Opinions of Herr Teufelsdrockh

By: Thomas Carlyle

...as completed;—thereby, in these his seemingly so aimless rambles, planting new standards, founding new habitable colonies, in the immeasurable circuma... ...him; and then, by quite foreign sugges- tion. By the arrival, namely, of a new Book from Professor Teufelsdrockh of Weissnichtwo; treating expressly o... ...lls; so that when a man walks, it is with continual jingling. Some few, of musical turn, have a whole chime of bells (Glockenspiel) fastened there; wh... ...th a Cupid for steersman! Consider their welts, a handbreadth thick, which waver round them by way of hem; the long flood of silver buttons, or rather... ...t of practical Reason’ proceeding by large Intuition over whole systematic groups and kingdoms; whereby, we might say, a noble complexity, almost like... ...er may imagine. So much we can see; darkly, as through the foliage of some wavering thicket: a youth of no common endow- 79 Thomas Carlyle ment, who ... ... hand-grips with Destiny her- self, may have comported himself among these Musical and Literary dilettanti of both sexes, like a hungry lion invited t... ...as articulately perhaps as the case admitted. Or call him, if you will, an American Backwoodsman, who had to fell unpenetrated forests, and battle wit... ...onsiderably involved in haze. To the first English Edition, 1838, which an American, or two American had now opened the way for, there was slightingly...

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Lord Ormont and His Aminta

By: George Meredith

...the younger fellows, without knowing what affected them, were moved by the new picture of a girl, as if it had been a frontispiece of a romantic story... ...rshy ground, where a couple of flat and shelving banks, formed for a broad new road, good for ten abreast—counting a step of the slopes—ran transverse... ...rn: Mr. Arthur Abner’s rec- ommendation,” he added hurriedly, with a light wave of his hand and a murmur, that might be the lady’s title; continu- ing... ...eate,’ her aunt would say, and she was thankful. Her heart rose on a quiet wave of the thanks, and pitched down to a depth of uncounted fathoms. Amint... ...he work, doesn’t dispirit. Otherwise, one may say that an African or South American traveller has a more exciting time. I shall manage to keep my head... ... be stubborn to resist a softness. Now she cared no more for the hackneyed musical word; friendship was her desire. If it is not life’s poetry, it is ... ... old housewives in doorways, gaffer goodman meeting his crony on the path, groups of boys and girls. She would take the girls, Matthew Weyburn the boy... ... 250 Lord Ormont and His Aminta ‘You may be feeling tired presently.’ The musical sincerity of her ‘Oh no, not I!’ sped through his limbs; he had a w... ...is boys: English, French, Germans, Italians, a Spaniard in my time—a South American I have sent him— two from Boston, Massachusetts—and clever!—all em...

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Tess of the Durbervilles

By: Thomas Hardy

...y I made some little time ago, whilst I was hunting up pedi grees for the new county history. I am Parson Tringham, the antiquary, of Stagfoot Lane. ... ...m over, and attempted some discrim ination; but, as the group were all so new to him, he could not very well exercise it. He took almost the first tha... ... why you are trying — those bullies! My mother wants you to carry on their musical education. How selfish of her! As if attending to these curst cocks ... ...nerous business when she had regained the art, for she had caught from her musical mother numerous airs that suited those songsters admirably. A far m... ...umference of the field, for the first passage of the horses and machine. Two groups, one of men and lads, and the other of women, had come down the lane... ...ling weed flowers glowed as if they would not close for intentness, and the waves of colour mixed with the waves of sound. The light which still shone ... ...ryman, landowner, agriculturist, and breeder of cattle. He would become an American or Australian Phase the Third — The Rally 103 Abraham, commanding... ...ent on peeling the lords and ladies till Clare, regarding for a moment the wave like curl of her lashes as they drooped with her bent gaze on her soft... ...om the back of a mule which was bearing him from the interior of the South American Continent towards the coast. His experiences of this strange land ...

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The Trial or More Links of the Daisy Chain

By: Charlotte Mary Yonge

...hard went; and the sisters took up their employments— Ethel writing to the New Zealand sister-in-law her history of the wedding, Mary copying parts of... ... Zealand sister-in-law her history of the wedding, Mary copying parts of a New Zealand letter for her brother, the lieutenant in command of a gun-boat... ...he latch-key. Ethel ran out, but her father was already on the stairs, and waved her back. ‘Here is some tea. Are you not coming, papa?—it is all here... ...st renowned instrumental pieces, which she could play as mechanically as a musical-box. ‘Not that jingling airified thing!’ cried Leonard, ‘I want som... ...age; and the ear was constantly struck by the regular roll and dash of the waves. Aubrey, though with the appetite of recovery and sea-air combined, c... ...of his magazine; and if driven to sing to him, took as little pains as her musical nature would let her do. But the very strength of her dislike gave ... ...ow could he suppose that any man could be crazed enough to prefer to be an American citizen, when he might remain a British subject? Repugnance to Ame... ...hate to see it, and to hear people say my roses will surprise the delicate Americans. Fancy, in a shop in London I met an old school-fellow, who was d... ...trees and hedges!’ then turned again to look in enchantment at the passing groups—far from noble, though bright with autumn tints—that alternated with...

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The Uncommercial Traveller

By: Charles Dickens

...rising and falling of the Tug-steamer, the Lighter, and the boat—the turning of the windlass—the coming in of the tide—that I myself seemed, to my own... ... little garden in coming out to meet me, not half an hour ago. So cheerful of spirit and guiltless of affectation, as true practical Christianity ever... ...d, on the lower part of The Uncommercial Traveller 17 the right arm, the device of a sailor and a female; the man holding the Union Jack with a strea... ...boys and young men among us; we had also many girls and young women. To represent, however, that we did not include a very great number, and a very fa... ...le Jack was, and very busy he was, and very cold he was: the snow yet lying in the frozen furrows of the land, and the north-east winds snip- ping off... ...hed as rear- guard. Sharp-eye, I soon had occasion to remark, had a skil- ful and quite professional way of opening doors—touched latches delicately, ... ...g come but the jug of ale and the bread, you implore your waiter to ‘see after that cutlet, waiter; pray do!’ He cannot go at once, for he is carrying... ...e hostelry which no man possessed of a penny was ever known to pass in warm weather. Before its entrance, are certain pleasant, trimmed limes; likewis... ...as already in the un- commercial line. This was a man who, though not more than thirty, had seen the world in divers irreconcilable capacities—had bee...

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The Adventures of Harry Richmond

By: George Meredith

...p of cinnamon-wood upon a sea that rolled mighty, but smooth immense broad waves, and tore thing from thing without a sound or a hurt. 14 The Adventu... ...ocured food for me; I have an idea of feeling a damp forehead and drinking new milk, and by- and-by hearing a roar of voices or vehicles, and seeing a... ...d gone, King Lear (or else my memory deceives me) punned, and Lady Macbeth waved a handkerchief for it to be steeped in the blood of the deer; Shylock... ...distractions, or I should have asked her whether my amazing and delightful new home had ever shown symptoms of vanishing; it appeared to me, judging f... ...apid, never high or low, and then a slide of similar tones all round, —not musical, but catching and incessant,— gave me an idea that I had fallen upo... ... lovely view,’ said I. ‘Lovely view,’ she repeated. She ran on in the most musical tongue, to my thinking, ever heard: ‘ And see my little pensioners’... ...ys, and others, all bending to roses, to admire, smell, or pluck. Charming groups of ladies were here and there; and T emple whispered as we passed th... ... disen- gage his right hand for the purpose of waving it toward one of the groups. I seized it, saying heartily, ‘Grandfather, upon my honour, I love ... ... soit peu philosophe, a ce qu’on dit; a traveller. They say he has a South American complexion. I knew him a boy; and his passion is to put together w...

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A Little Tour in France

By: Henry James

... university. 3 Henry James A Little Tour In France by Henry James WE GOOD AMERICANS—I say it without presumption—are too apt to think that France is ... ...vantage, are in the vulgar taste which seems doomed to stamp itself on all new Catholic work; but there was never-theless a great sweetness in the sce... ...te, the happy proportions, the color of this beautiful front, to which the new feeling for a purely domestic architecture—an architecture of security ... ... of that year,—the letter, directed to his so-called subjects, in which he waves aloft the white flag of the Bourbons. This amazing epistle, which is ... ...et mansion stood looking over a wide green lawn, over banks of flowers and groups of trees. It had a striking character of elegance, produced partly b... ... of old furniture, as all apartments should be through which the insatiate American wanders in the rear of a bored domestic, pausing to stare at a fad... ...would suggest that the imagination of Jacques Coeur was fond of riding the waves. Indeed, as he trafficked in Ori- ental products and owned many galle... ...s warm and still; the air was admirably soft. The good Manceaux, in little groups and pairs, were seated near me; my ear was soothed by the fine shade... ...ectory) dur- ing which the treasure could not be shown. The purpose of the musical chimes to which I had so artlessly listened was to usher in this fr...

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The Life of John Sterling

By: Thomas Carlyle

... of all the scientific faculties he had;—very strange mystery indeed, this new arrival, and fresh deni- zen of our Universe: “Wull’t eat a-body?” said... ...m his German campaignings, and had before long, though not till after some waverings on his part, attached firmly to the Duke of Ormond and to the Kin... ...- toration we find him again, safe, and as was natural, flour- ishing with new splendor; gifted, recompensed with lands;—settled, in short, on fair re... ...f new fortunes. Glamorganshire was at least a better climate than Bute; no groups of idle or of busy reapers could here stand waiting on the guidance ... ...ves; crossed by roads and human traffic, here inaudible or heard only as a musical hum: and behind all swam, under olive-tinted haze, the illimitable ... ...ught, and drown the world and you!—I have heard Coleridge talk, with eager musical en- ergy, two stricken hours, his face radiant and moist, and commu... ...e given up, and formed (if the room were large enough) secondary hum- ming groups of their own. He began anywhere: you put some question to him, made ... ...that duty is the highest law of his own being; and knowing how it bids the waves be stilled into an icy fixedness and grandeur, he trusts (but with a ... ...a disastrous shadow hanging over it, not to be cleared away by effort. Two American gentlemen, acquaintances also of mine, had been recommended to him...

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